Wallbox Pulsar Plus EV Charger Full Review

Wallbox Pulsar Plus EV Charger Full Review

Wallbox is new to North America, but It is not a new company. The company has been around for several years and has been selling equipment in over 40 countries.

They’ve actually made over a hundred thousand units. The Pulsar Plus Level 2 smart charger is their most popular unit, which may be the reason that they brought it to North America first.

In this article, we will go over its features in terms of power, weatherproof rating, construction, and smart features.

We hope this in-depth review will guide you in selecting the Pulsar Plus or perhaps another one of the chargers that we’ve reviewed before.

Overall Rating: 4.6 out of 5.0

Power and Weatherproof Rating

Powerful EV Charger – The Pulsar Plus charger is a 40-amp unit that can deliver slightly less than 10 kilowatts to your vehicle that’s good enough to charge your EV at a rate of somewhere between 24 and 32 miles of range per hour that depends on how efficient your electric vehicle is (Use our Electric Car Charging Time Calculator to calculate the estimated charge time of your own EV).

It can deliver the energy, but the vehicle has to be efficient in order to squeeze out more miles per kilowatt-hour.

It has adjustable power, and you can de-rate the power all the way down to 6 amps. You do that in the app when you’re initially setting the charger up.

It comes with a NEMA 14-50 plug. If you don’t want to plug it in, you can remove it and then just hardwire it.

NEMA 4 Rating – It also has a NEMA 4 rated exterior enclosure that’s important if you’re mounting it outside.

Most chargers today have NEMA 3 rating, which are also good for outdoor use.

However, if you live in an area with inclement weather, frequent blowing rainstorms, or driving snowstorms, NEMA 4 enclosures provide an extra level of protection.

Construction

Small Size – One of the first things you’ll notice about the unit is how small it is. It’s really compact.

The charger is only about eight inches wide by eight inches tall, and it only sticks off of the wall about four inches.

Connector and Cable – The connector of the Pulsar Plus charger is the standard J1772 one that is a common connector for all electric vehicles on the road in North America except for Tesla vehicles as Tesla uses their proprietary connector.

However, you can still use the Pulsar Plus EV charger to charge your Tesla via an adapter.

The charger has a 25-foot long cable standard which is the longest cable you’re going to find on any electric vehicle charging equipment available on the market today.

While the cable doesn’t perform fantastically. It is going to be nice and flexible if you live in warm areas, but it will probably get a little bit stiffer than that of the ChargePoint Home Flex charger.

Remote Connector Holster – The Wallbox Pulsar Plus charger has remote connector holsters. They basically give you a plastic connector holster that you mount on the wall, and the connector locks into that.

The quality might not be very good, and if you want a durable one, the BougeRV EV charger holster may be a nice choice.

You can mount the holster wherever you’d like. You don’t have to mount it right next to the unit.

The Grizzl-E charger also has the remote connector holster, while the ChargePoint Home Flex and the JuiceBox charger  have the integrated connector holsters.

wallbox Pulsar Plus remote connector holster

LED Circle – The Pulsar Plus has a LED circle around the front of the unit. It will display different colors when the charger is in different modes.- It’s a solid green color while it’s in standby mode.

– It turns to a dark blue blinking color once you plug in a vehicle, and it begins charging.

– There’s a solid turquoise color when the      home charger is in the ready mode, which means that the charger detects that it’s connected to a car, but it’s kind of in a transition status.

It’ll happen if it is plugged in and the car is still communicating with the charger. Or if the charging session is paused by the user via the app.

led circle

– The blinking turquoise color means that the unit is plugged in, and it’s ready to charge, but the owner has set up a schedule for charging.

– It’s a solid yellow color if the Pulsar Plus is in lock mode through the app.

– It’s red when the charger’s in error mode. Then do not use the Pulsar Plus, contact Wallbox and ask for direction on what you should be doing at that point.

Smart Charger

The Pulsar Plus charger is a smart charger that has a lot of smart charging features more than most smart chargers do.

Power Sharing – It also is power-sharing capable that can be an important feature to have for a number of reasons.

First off, if you live in a private garage, you can only have one circuit to your garage, and your electric capacity may be at its maximum or maybe you just don’t want to pay to have an electrician run a second circuit to your garage, and you have two electric vehicles, the ability to share power is really a good feature to have in a two EV household.

Power Sharing

It’s becoming more commonplace these days where people got their first electric vehicle a couple of years ago, and they liked it so much. Then they got their second car, and they become a two EV household.

You can actually run two Pulsar Plus chargers on one circuit if you were to have a 50-amp circuit run to your garage.

You can have two NEMA 14-50 outlets share that circuit and the Pulsar Plus charger would intelligently split the power between the two vehicles.

This feature can be even more important in a multi-family dwelling, an apartment, complex condo units where chargers are shared amongst many of the residents.

In that situation, the property manager only needs to run a couple of circuits and install a whole bunch of Wallbox chargers, and then these chargers just intelligently share the power.

Separate Accounts with Direct Billing – There’s another feature that isn’t enabled yet, but Wallbox is working on it, and it’s going to be enabled.

The feature will come via an over-the-air software update, and it will be the ability to have separate accounts and direct billing.

For example, If you live in an apartment complex, and there are multiple families that have electric vehicles, you each can set up your own account and get your own bill at the end of the month for using the chargers.

It is a really great feature. Charging in multi-family dwellings like apartment complexes, has been a real pain point for electric vehicle owners.

With this, once they set up the separate accounts with direct billing, the Pulsar Plus charger is really going to be a good tool for those types of communities to make charging that much easier.

Wi-Fi and Bluetooth Enabled – It’s the Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connected smart charger that’s rare. Most smart chargers are Wi-Fi connected and don’t offer Bluetooth connectivity, but the Pulsar Plus charger does.

Why would you want that feature? These charging jobs are often done in parking garages, some of which are underground, and sometimes they’re far from the main building.

Besides, there’s no Wi-Fi service in the parking garage, so it can’t connect.

wifi-bluetooth-connection

In the case of the Pulsar Plus, you can connect it through Bluetooth on your smartphone. You do have to be within the range of the charger, of course. Then you can open it up, unlock the charger and use it.

You could also schedule charging and so forth as long as you’re within the area.

It’s a neat feature that it has both Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity.

OCPP Capability – The charger also has Open Charge Point Protocol (OCPP) capability, and that’s important if you want to participate in Utility Demand Programs.

The programs are not very common yet, but they are happening more and more, particularly in California.

That’s basically where you sign an agreement with your utility, and you allow them to control when you charge if the grid is under stress.

When they’re having problems with high demand, they can scale back your charging, either shut it off or lower the charging and then re-initiate your charging later on when they have the capacity to charge the car.

By agreeing to do that, you get dramatically lower electricity rates. Now there are pilot programs popping up all around the country, and this isn’t something that you might really be on your radar today, but it is something that a few years down the road.

A lot of people are going to be in service districts that offer Demand Response Programs for EV charging.  If you have an EV charger that can participate in it, you’re one step ahead of the game.

It is a neat feature. Even if you don’t use it now, you might use it sometime down the road.

Scheduling Time and Sending Notifications – The charger allows you to set a schedule to charge your vehicle at a certain time during the week and on the weekends. Then you can take advantage of the low rates during the off-peak periods.

The Pulsar Plus also sends out two different kinds of notifications.

The first notification it will send is to tell you when your charging session is finished. You get a license notification on your smartphone that says, “hey, charging’s all done. You’re good to go”.

The second notification is a reminder to plug it in. When you have scheduled charging and have the vehicle set to charge at a certain time, it will send you a notification 10 minutes before the planned charging begins.

NOTE: It might be better if the charger allows you to manipulate that and set it, say for an hour before or whatever you want. 

That might be something that would be worthwhile for a future update for Wallbox. 

Because quite often, if you have scheduled charging for late at night around midnight, you might go to sleep at 10 or 11 o’clock, and you get the notification at 10 to 12 that you didn’t plug in, but you’re asleep by then.

Amazon Alexa and Google Assistant Compatible – The Wallbox Pulsar Plus is Amazon Alexa and Google Assistant compatible. You simply say “Alexa, open my Wallbox Assistant” or “Hey Google, talk to my Wallbox,” and it then recognizes some commands.

What commands are available to use with the Wallbox Assistant?

– Start charging my Wallbox.

– What’s the status of my charging?

– Lock my charger.

– What’s my charger’s serial number?

– List my chargers (if you have multiple chargers).

– How much energy have I used to charge my battery this month?

– What was my charging cost this month?

– How much time have I spent charging my EV this month?

– Schedule a charging session.

– Contact customer support (if you’re having issues with the charger)

– …

Let’s take a quick look at the app. The main screen of the app is displayed. You can press the lock button to lock your charger. You press the scheduled timer button if you want to schedule charging.

You can view some statistics on the charging sessions on the bottom, such as how many kilowatt-hours you took on each session, how many hours you were plugged in, how long you charged for and what it cost you ( the cost is based on what you set up: pay per kilowatt-hour, pay per hour, pay per minute).

Amazon Alexa and Google Assistant Compatible
Main Screen of the App Pulsar Plus

NOTE: There’s one thing I need to note here: if you plug in your vehicle more than 12 hours before the schedule is set, the vehicle will start charging automatically.

Because the Wallbox can only use its scheduling feature if you plug in less than 12 hours in advance, so that’s important to note for those that may be on time of use plans.

Safety Certified and Warranty

Safety Certified – The Pulsar Plus home charger is safety certified.

Warranty – The EV home charger comes with a  standard three-year warranty.

TIPS

The Wallbox Pulsar Plus is a 40-amp powerful smart charger. It’s really one of the most compact chargers you’re going to find on the market today.

It’s Wi-Fi and Bluetooth enabled, and through the app you’re able to control the unit.

It has a 25-foot long cord and a high-quality rubberized connector and currently sells for $649.00.

The Pulsar Plus will be a really competitive home charger, which will be the competitor of  the ChargePoint Home Flex and the Enel X JuiceBox smart charger, two of the most popular smart chargers on the market today.

Grizzl-E Classic Electric Vehicle (EV) Charger Review

Grizzl-E Classic Electric Vehicle (EV) Charger Review

The Grizzl-E Classic EV home charger is one of the best-built and strongest chargers on the market today. It is manufactured by United Chargers and made in Canada.

Many of the people have the Grizzly-E EV home charging stations installed outside their homes, so they want the cables to be really tough and be able to handle harsh Canadian winters, so this is one solid unit, tougher than most.

 

Overall Rating: 4.5 out of 5.0

Main Features of the Grizzl-E Classic EV Charger

Power Output – The Grizzl-E is one of the powerful power-adjustable Level 2 EV chargers. When you order a Grizzl-E EV charger, you specify which power level (four distinct power levels: 40A, 32A, 24A, and 16A) you want. It will be set and will come at the specific power level.

However, if you need to change the power level, you simply open the front of the cover-up, which is just four screws, and you set the dip switch to the power you want it to deliver.

Power Output of the Grizzl-E Classic EV Charger
Power rating (A) Circuit breaker (A) Power delivery (kW) Charge rate (mph)
40 50 9.6 28-30
32 40 7.7 22-25
24 30 5.8 15-18
16 20 3.9 10-12

The unit with the maximum current power delivery of 40 amps needs to be on a 50-amp circuit breaker, which can deliver 9.6kW;

If you set the EV charger at 32A, that would need to be on a 40-amp circuit, which would provide 7.7 kW;

If the power level is set at 24A, a 30A circuit breaker would be needed, and 5.8 kilowatts of power can be delivered to the EV; Similarly, 16 amps are on a 20-amp circuit, and 3.9 kW of power delivery could happen.

Besides, you would get different charge rates when setting the charger at different power levels.

At 40 amps, 28-30 miles of range per hour of charging would be added; at 32 amps, 22-25 miles of range per hour; at 24 amps, 15-18 miles of range per hour; at 16 amps, 10-12 miles of range per hour.

Cable Length and Pliability – The Grizzl-E comes standard with an 18-foot cable, but there is an optional 24-foot cable that only costs $20 extra. Getting the extra six-foot-long cable for a 24-foot cord would be better.

You also can choose from the regular cable or what they call a premium cable that also costs $20 extra. The premium cable is meant to be better for outdoor installations in cold-weather areas.

It’s supposed to be more flexible and a little bit tougher. After being deeply frozen for 14 hours., it easily bent and unbent. The Grizzl-E had a much better performance in terms of cable pliability than the Enel-X JuiceBox charger, but less good than the ChargePoint Home Flex charger.

If you don’t live in a cold-weather area, you probably don’t need to spend the extra twenty dollars. If you live in Southern California or Miami, or Texas, you probably will stick with the regular cable.

But if you live in cold weather areas, the thick and heavy premium cable should bend a lot better than the regular one under extreme weather.

Connector – The Grizzl-E comes with the J1772 charging connector, plasticky, but it seems durable enough.

It can work on all battery electric vehicles (BEVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) on the market in North America except for Tesla. But if you use a J1772 to Tesla adapter, charging a Tesla with the Grizzl-E EV charger would not be a problem.

Connector Holster –Some electric car chargers come with an attached connector holster and cable management system, so the connector is holstered right into the main unit.

But some chargers don’t. They give you a remote connector holster. That’s the case with the Grizzl-E charger and the Wallbox Pulsar Plus charger.

The package of the Grizzl-E EV charger includes a remote connector holster which helps hold the connector and manage the cable as well.

United Chargers calls the remote connector holster easy EV plug. They claim that it’s much easier to holster the connector with their holster than it is on some of the competing brands.

The holster has a wide tapered opening. No matter how you put the connector in this hole, it will lock. You don’t have to put it perfectly and the taper will guide it into the hole. You don’t even have to hold the connector.

As there are no backlights, the easy EV plug makes it simple. You just have to find the opening, and the connector will snap in.

In contrast, some other companies offer integrated connector holsters and have them backlit, so at night it’s easy to find the connector holster.

Grizzl classic

Hardwired or Plug-In – The Grizzl-E comes in a plug-in version with a NEMA 14-50 or NEMA 6-50 plug. It’s easy to install. You will need to have a NEMA 14-50 or NEMA 6-50 outlet to plug the Grizzl-E charger in.

The Grizzl-E charger comes with two mounting plates, a base plate that gets attached to the wall and a  second plate that you attach to the back of the charger.

Automatic Restart The Grizzl-E charger can automatically restart, which means if the chargers are in the middle of a charging session, the power goes out, and then the power is restored, the chargers will re-initialize the charging session and charge the car again.

Smart or Non-Smart – The Grizzl-E is not a smart charger. It just simply charges your electric car.

Weatherproof Rating – The Grizzl-E is one of the most solid chargers on the market today. It has a NEMA 4 rated water and air-tight metal enclosure, which means it can withstand even the pressure of a direct blast of a garden hose.

When you’re in a cold-weather area or an area that gets frequent blowing rainstorms, the NEMA 4 rated chargers are a little bit better than the NEMA 3 rated ones for outdoor installations.

The difference between NEMA 3 and NEMA 4 chargers is that the NEMA 4 rated chargers prevent water from getting in the enclosure even in extreme conditions.

The NEMA 3 rated enclosures are still suitable for outdoor installations, and you don’t have any problem with those if you live in a mild climate area.

However, if you’re in an extreme weather area like some of the northern states that get a lot of blowing snowstorms, or even just the states that get frequent heavy rainstorms with blowing rain, you might want to consider a NEMA 4 rated charger. The Grizzl-E charger would be a great option.

weatherproof safety warranty

Safety Certified – The Grizzl-E charger is safety certified for electrical safety. It’s UL listed.

Warranty – The Grizzl-E charger comes with a 3-year warranty.

Other EV Home Charging Products by United Chargers

Grizzl Avalanche Edition and Extreme Edition – The United Chargers also offers the Avalanche and Extreme Editions of Grizzl-E home EV charging station.

The Avalanche Edition comes with a white case and a matching white 24-foot premium cable. It looks clean.

The Extreme Edition comes with a premium 24-foot cable. What the Extreme Edition is different from the Classic Grizzl-E charger is the camo design on the exterior.

Grizzl-e-avalanche-edition-extreme-edition

Grizzl-E smart EV charger – Grizzl-E smart EV charger, the Alpha, will be released in the near future. You can pre-order it on the United Chargers Alpha website.

The Alpha is Wi-Fi connected and compatible with OCPP 1.6 application. Smart charging features like charging session recording, time scheduling, and getting notifications, etc. will appear.

Mini Grizzl-E – The Mini Grizzl-E, another home EV charging station, is coming soon. It can deliver the same power up to 10 kW as the Classic Grizzl-E, but smaller than the Classic Grizzl-E.

The compact design allows you to transport the Mini Grizzl-E easily so you can charge up your electric car conveniently and quickly while you’re on vacation. It has smart charging features as some competitors do.

Grizzl-E Duo – The Grizzl-E Duo, a compact smart charger, which also delivers up to 10 kW to the EV, can power share and charge two electric cars at the same time. It’s coming soon.

TIPS

The durable Grizzl-E is a 40-amp charger with a good warranty. It costs only 439 US dollars if you purchase one with a NEMA 14-50 plug and a 24-foot premium cable on Amazon, which is a great value for a powerful power-adjustable charger.

If you are looking for a charger (non-smart) and you just want to plug it in and charge your car quickly, the Grizzl-E charger might be your best choice.

If you own more than one electric car, Tesla and non-Tesla, the Grizzl-E charger with a J1772-Tesla adapter may meet your needs as well.

Enel-X JuiceBox Electric Vehicle (EV) Charger Review

Enel-X JuiceBox Electric Vehicle (EV) Charger Review

The JuiceBox smart EV charger is one of the best Level 2 home chargers available on the market. It is the second generation of the JuiceBox charge. This article is about  the comprehensive review of the JuiceBox 40.

 

 

Overall Rating: 4.6 out of 5.0

The Enel-X JuiceBox 40 is the second generation JuiceBox 40. Around 2014, a little startup in California called eMotorWerks developed the JuiceBox, the first smart charger available anywhere.

It was a great unit and got popular quickly. The company blew up in 2017. A giant utility that’s headquartered in Italy called Enel-X bought eMotorWerks.

What they did was promptly redesign the JuiceBox to come out with the second generation.

The second-generation JuiceBox EV charger has been available for a while on the market.

 

first generation vs second generation of JuiceBox

The first generation JuiceBox didn’t have a connector holster or integrated cable management system. It was just the unit, and it had a separate connector holster.

You could mount it anywhere on the wall, and you don’t have to have it right at the unit.

The second-generation JuiceBox EV charger has the cable management system and the integrated connector holster, that is, connector holster built into the unit.

If you want to locate the connector holster somewhere else, you can get a little plastic one to make it.

Major Features of JuiceBox Charger

Now that we’ve covered the minor differences between these two generations of JuiceBox EV charger. Let’s take a look at some main features  of the second-generatino JuiceBox now.

Power and Weatherproof Rating

Power Output – The JuiceBox charger is now available in three different power levels: a 32-amp unit which can deliver 7.6 kilowatts of the electric car; a 40-amp unit that can deliver 9.6 kilowatts; a 48-amp unit that can deliver up to 11.5 kilowatts of the EV.

JuiceBox-power-output
Plugs Circuit rating (A) Maximum power delivery to the EV (A) Voltage (V) Maximum power delivery to the EV (kW)
NEMA 14-50 40 32 240 7.6
50 40 240 9.6
NEMA 14-60 60 48 240 11.5

The JuiceBox 40 needs to be on a 50-amp dedicated circuit.

There’s an 80 rule by the NEC code. So if this is going to deliver 40 amps, it has to be on a circuit. That’s 125 of what it’s going to deliver. That would be 50 amps.

So if you had a JuiceBox 32, that would need to be on a dedicated 40-amp circuit.

If you had a JuiceBox 48, you would need a dedicated 60-amp circuit.

The JuiceBox 32 and the JuiceBox 40 come in plug-in versions as standard. The JuiceBox 48 has to be hardwired, so you don’t have the option to plug it in.

You could always do that yourself and install a NEMA 14-60 outlet as well as put on a dongle with a NEMA 14-60 plug, but that would be on you, and if you do decide to do that, we urge you to have your qualified electrician do that.

One of the good things about the JuiceBox charger is that the power is adjustable, so even if you bought the JuiceBox 40 and you only had a 40-amp circuit, you could throttle down the power delivery within the app.

You might ask why you wouldn’t just get the JuiceBox 32 EV charger.

If you’re only on a 40-amp circuit, it’s fine. But in the future, when you’re thinking about upgrading the circuit to deliver more power, you don’t have to worry about buying a new charger if you have the higher power JuiceBox charger already.

Energy Star Certified – This EV charger is Energy Star Certified for efficiency. Not many electric car chargers currently are Energy Star Certified. So that’s another plus for the JuiceBox charger.

Weatherproof Rating – The rating for the exterior enclosure of the charger, like the original one, is NEMA 4X rated, which is very good. That means it can withstand even the worst blowing rainstorms and snowstorms.

If you live in a hurricane area or up in Canada where you get these crazy blowing snowstorms, you might want to consider a NEMA 4X unit like the JuiceBox.

You can even blast this directly with a garden hose and water will not get into the enclosure. It gives you an extra level of protection.

Construction and Durability

Weight and Dimension – The JuiceBox charger weighs 16 lb, and the dimensions are 7.6 inches wide by 18.6 inches high by 5.6 inches deep.

Connector – The JuiceBox charger uses the universal J1772 connector. The J1772 connector will work on every EV on the market in North America except for Tesla.

However, the EV charger will charge any Tesla model just fine with the J1772 to Tesla adapter.

But if you have any car other than Tesla, the connector will simply just plug into the car and charge it without the need of any kind of adapter as far as the connector that Enel-X uses for the JuiceBox chargersis with high quality. It’s a nice robust connector that lasts long.

juicebox_40_construction

Connector Holster – It’s not easy to holster the connector. It would be better if the company redesigns this a little bit to make it a little bit easier to put the connector into it and lock it.

Locking System – Enel-X has a really good feature on the JuiceBox charger that most other chargers do not have. In fact, very few EV chargers come with this good feature – locking system.

The JuiceBox EV charger comes with a key locking system that you can lock the unit to a bracket physically, so nobody can steal it.

You might have your charger mounted outside, or live in a condo complex, where other people are exposed to the EV charging station. The Enel-X JuiceBox allows you to lock the unit with the key.

In that case, nobody can steal it or at least they can’t steal it easily. Some of the other units simply just hang on the wall and since they’re plugged in, you could just unplug them, unhook them and run away with them.

This cannot happen to the JuiceBox charger because of the key locking system.

Cable Length and Pliability – The Enel-X JuiceBox charger comes with a 25 -foot cable as standard, like the Wallbox Pulsar Plus charger. It is actually the longest cable that is allowed by NEC code. You won’t find a level 2 charger with a longer cable than this.

The cable is a little thicker, heavier and a little less pliable than some of the competitors, such as the ChargePoint Home Flex charger and the Tesla wall charger.

The JuiceBox charger cable is a little bit more plasticky rather than rubberized and it’s a little bit harder to bend. It performs badly at the room temperature, not even under the cold weather.

Plug-In and Hardwired – The JuiceBox charger comes with a NEMA 14-50 plug. You can both plug it in and hardwire this unit. It’s very easy to install. We recommend that you hire a licensed electrician to hardwire the charger.

The JuiceBox is built very solidly. Even if it’s plastic and not metal, it’s very thick and it may be one of the well built units on the market currently.

Smart Charger

A dumb (or Non-smart) charger is an electric car charger that you plug your car in and it charges your EV. That’s really basically what you want an EV charger to do.

However, there are other things that smart chargers can do to make the ownership experience a little bit better. Let’s go over the smart charging of the JuiceBox charger.

Control and Monitoring – First of all, after installing your JuiceBox charger, you need to download the JuiceBox app and connect your device to your Wi-Fi and then pair it with your app. Once you do that, you can see things, like

– The current charging of the vehicle;

– How long it’s been charging;

– You can start and stop a charging session;

– You could see the real-time power delivery to your vehicle;

– You get to see past charging sessions;

– How long the car charged for how much energy it took.

With that, you can really see exactly how much your car is costing you every month to charge, unlike gasoline cars where you know how much it costs you, because you get a receipt or you see it on the gas pump yourself.

When you plug your electric car in at home and it charges overnight, you really don’t know how much you just spent on charging your car, but with an app like what the Enel-X JuiceBox charger offers, you get to see exactly what it cost you, so you could see exactly what your electric car cost you per month.

Reminders and Notifications – It can send you notifications. You can set the JuiceBox app to say,” Hey, at 10 o’clock, if i’m not plugged in, send me a message to remind me to plug in”.

That’s a good feature for first-time EV buyers, especially when you first get your electric car and you’re not used to plugging the car in every day.

Automatic Restart – The EV charging station has an automatic restart function. If you have a power outage while your car is charging and after the power is restored, the JuiceBox charger will begin to deliver power to your vehicle again as long as your vehicle accepts it.

Amazon Alexa and Google Home Compatible – The JuiceBox charger is Amazon Alexa and Google Home Compatible, which is also a very good feature to have. So if you have Amazon Alexa, you can say,” Hey Alexa, start charging my electric car or hey Alexa, how many miles of range did I add in this charging session.” 

Alexa can connect to Google Home assistant. Many people might not go into that, but some people really appreciate that the EV charger can work with both of those systems.

Being able to Participate In Utility Demand Response Programs – The JuiceBox charger can also work with Utility Demand Response Programs, while there aren’t very many of them out there just yet, but they are coming.

There are more and more getting added every year. That’s basically where you make a deal with your utility, and you give them access to your charger remotely.

In the middle of summer, the utility demand is very high and everybody has their air conditioners on. When you come home at night, if you plug in, you’ll get a notification “do you mind if I start charging your car at midnight, not now or at six o’clock at night” and you’ll either say yes or no.

If you need to go out that night, and want to start the car charging right now, and you say, “no, I need it to charge right now.” The car will start charging.

But if you don’t have to drive the car until the morning.  The utility gives you favorable rates if you make your car start charging at midnight.  Sometimes it can save you a lot of money in doing so.

So being able to participate in these Demand Response Programs might not be a really big deal today, but it’s going to be in the coming years. It could save you money down the road.

Power Share Capable – Another thing that the JuiceBox charger has is it can share power. That’s an important feature. Because more and more people are getting the second EV.

What power-sharing does is it allows two JuiceBoxes chargers to work on one circuit. You may only have the capacity to add one 50-amp circuit in your house because the service panel is full.

You don’t want to cost thousands of money to upgrade the service.

Now you’ve got two EVs,  so you can get a second JuiceBox charger, and connect them together.They’ll talk to each other and they won’t overload the circuit.

They’ll charge one car first. When one EV is finished charging, the second EV starts charging.

Therefore it saves your money on either having to do a full upgrade or buying two chargers that are very low-powered and always charging the car slowly.

Safety Certified and Warranty

Safety Certified – The JuiceBox is safety certified. It’s UL listed.

Warranty – The JuiceBox comes with a three-year warranty for normal residential use, which is pretty much the standard for quality electric car chargers. 

TIPS

The JuiceBox charger is capable of charging any EV in North America, non-Tesla and Tesla vehicles (charge with a J1772-Tesla adapter).

Overall, the JuiceBox 40 is a very cost-effective EV home charger. It costs $649 if you get a plug-in version on Amazon. The features of power share capability and NEMA 4X weatherproof rating highlight the charger.

ChargePoint Home Flex Electric Vehicle (EV) Charger Review

ChargePoint Home Flex Electric Vehicle (EV) Charger Review

The ChargePoint Home Flex Wi-Fi enabled EV charger is one of the best Level 2 (also known as Type 1) home chargers available on the market. It is ChargePoint’s latest and most dynamic offering for EV home chargers.

 

 

Overall Rating: 4.6 out of 5.0

The ChargePoint Home Flex is actually the second generation in the ChargePoint home line. The first one appeared in 2015 and it was simply called the ChargePoint Home. Now let’s look at the major differences between these two generations of EV chargers.

 Comparisons of ChargePoint Home Flex and ChargePoint Home

EV charger Color Power delivery Cable length Hardwired or plug-in Available on the market
ChargePoint Home Flex Dark gray Flexible, 16-50 amps 23 feet Both Available
ChargePoint Home Shiny black 16 & 32 amps 12,18,25 feet Both Unavailable

Color – The ChargePoint Home Flex looks identical to the ChargePoint Home, except the outer casing is dark gray, unlike the ChargePoint Home charger with the shiny black color.

Power Delivery – The original ChargePoint Home was offered in two options based on power delivery. It can deliver 16 amps or 32 amps to the electric car.

The ChargePoint streamlined these two options, eliminated them and created a flexible charger which is why it’s now called the ChargePoint Home Flex.

The ChargePoint Home Flex is capable of flexible power delivery from 16 amps to 50 amps. In other words, you can set the power output to match the circuit you have it on, from a 20-amp circuit that can deliver 16 amps to the vehicle, all the way up to the maximum power delivery of the ChargePoint Home Flex, which is 50 amps.

When you set up the app after installation, you’re asked the rating of the circuit it’s on. The ChargePoint Home Flex automatically sets the maximum amount of power that it will deliver to the EV.

That’s one of the biggest improvements the Flex has over the previous generation of ChargePoint home chargers.

Cable Length – The original ChargePoint Home came with cable length options of 12 feet, 18 feet and 25 feet. The ChargePoint Home Flex is only available in 23 feet now. 

Hardwired or Plug-In – Unlike the original ChargePoint Home, which offers both hardwired and plug-in versions, the ChargePoint Home Flex only comes as a plug-in unit and customers can choose between a NEMA 6-50 and a NEMA 14-50 plug (Check NEMA 6 and NEMA 14 plugs) .

If you prefer to hardwire the unit, you can easily remove the plug and hardwire it directly. So practically, the Home Flex EV charger can also be changed to a hardwired unit. Installation is very simple on the ChargePoint Home Flex. You can check the plug-in installation video and hardwired installation video by the ChargePoint .

Available or Unavailable –The older ChargePoint Home has already been discontinued, but the latest model, the Home Flex EV charging station is available on the market.

Major Features of ChargePoint Home Flex

Now that we’ve covered the significant upgrades in the ChargePoint Home Flex from the previous generation of ChargePoint Home. Let’s take a look at some of its main features now.

Power and Weatherproof Rating

Power Output – The ChargePoint Home FlexIt’s is a powerful power-adjustable EV charger. It can deliver power of 3.8-12 kW.

The charging speed your electric car can charge at depends on several factors, such as the rating of the circuit you connect it to, the amperage rating you select, your EV’s battery capacity, and the acceptance rate of the on-board charger, and so on (See the factors influencing the charging rate).

Plugs Circuit rating (A) Maximum power delivery to the EV (A) Voltage (V) Maximum power delivery to the EV (kW)
NEMA 6-50 & 14-50 30 24 240 5.7
40 32 240 7.6
50 40 240 9.6
NEMA 14-60 60 48 240 11.5

If you have a 30-amp circuit available, the ChargePoint Home Flex can be set to deliver 24 amps to the vehicle and it won’t overload your circuit.

If you have a 50-amp circuit available, it can deliver 40 amps according to the rule of 80% draw (EVSE or electric vehicle service equipment can provide a maximum of 80% of the circuit’s rating).

So if you have a 40-amp circuit, the most power the charger can deliver to the vehicle is 32 amps.

The Flex takes this into consideration. When you set up the app after installation, you’re asked the rating of the circuit it’s on.

The ChargePoint Home Flex automatically sets the maximum amount of power that it will deliver to the EV. So you don’t have to worry about, and it does all the work for you as long as you know what your circuit is rated at.

Energy Star Certified – The ChargePoint Home Flex is one of the few chargers that is Energy Star Certified for energy efficiency.

Weatherproof Rating – The ChargePoint Home Flex is NEMA 3R weatherproof rated, so it’s fine for outdoor use.

However, some of the competing chargers, such as the JuiceBox EV charger, the Wallbox Pulsar Plus Level 2 EV charger, and the Grizzl-E home charger, have a NEMA 4 rating which is a little better.

NEMA 4 rated chargers can withstand even a direct blast from a garden hose without water inside.

If you need to mount your charger outside and you live in an area that frequently gets blowing rainstorms and snowstorms, for that matter, you might want to consider a NEMA 4 rated charger. It will give you an extra level of protection (Check NEMA Enclosure Ratings).

Construction and Durability

Weight and Dimension – The ChargePoint Home Flex is one of the smallest sleekest EV chargers available today. It weighs only 13.8 pounds and has a very small footprint of only 7.06 inches wide by 11.19 inches deep.

Connector – The J1772 connector that’s used by the ChargePoint Home Flex is a custom connector. The Home Flex comes with a high-quality connector, and the handle has a pronounced taper where your index finger resides.

J1772 connector and NEMA plug

Connector Holster – The ChargePoint Home Flex has an exaggerated tapered edge leading into the connector holster. The tapered edge helps to guide the connector into its locking position.

You don’t need to line the connector up perfectly. With this opening, the tapered edge guides it into the locking position very easily.

The backlit connector holster of the Home Flex charger also helps in a dark garage or a poorly lit outdoor installation.

Cable Length and Pliability – The cable length is 23 feet, longer than 20 feet. The cable on the ChargePoint Home Flex is average thickness and very flexible at room temperature.

After being deeply frozen for 14 hours, the ChargePoint Home Flex cable performed excellent. It regained its flexibility and was allowed to fold it in larger loops.

It was bending nice and easily, which means that the cable would perform very well below zero temperatures, especially if you have your car parked out overnight and you wake up in the morning and you want to come out, but you don’t want to pull the connector.

Plug-In and Hardwired – The ChargePoint Home Flex does come in a plug-in version with a NEMA 14-50 or NEMA 6-50 plug, but you can have your qualified licensed electrician hardwire it if you prefer to.

Indicator Light – Different colors that the ChargePoint Home Flex displays on the led indicate the different status of the charger is under.

Solid white: It’s lost its wifi connection.

Blinking white: It hasn’t been activated yet. When you first install your ChargePoint Home Flex before you’ve paired it with your wi-fi and set up your account, it will be blinking white.

Solid green: The charger is ready to charge.

Blinking green: There is a schedule set. When you set on a time of use electricity plan and want to save some money with overnight charging.

Solid blue: It’s plugged into a vehicle but not currently charging.

Blinking blue: The car is actively charging.

Red: There may be some kind of trouble. What you want to do then is contact the ChargePoint customer support to run a diagnostic and figure out what’s going on.

Overall, the ChargePoint Home Flex is a good, solid unit with robust construction.

Smart Charger

Charging Session Recording – The ChargePoint Home Flex is a Wi-Fi connected smart charger. Connecting to the ChargePoint app is very straightforward.

The ChargePoint app allows you to view pass charging sessions and see exactly how much energy your car took in and how much it cost you.

Time Scheduling – You can also schedule the time for the car to charge and save you with off-peak electricity rates.

You can also schedule a reminder to plug in, and the ChargePoint Home Flex will send you a notification, which can definitely be a useful feature, especially for new EV owners who haven’t yet formed that habit of plugging in regularly.

Plus, you can check the real-time charging status in your ChargePoint mobile app to see if anybody else is using the charger unauthorizedly.

Resume Charging – Your electric car is charging and then you lose power. When the power gets restored, will it immediately start charging the EV again?

The answer is definitely, YES. The EV charger restarted and began charging after a power outage. It can restart automatically.

Amazon Alexa Compatible – The ChargePoint Home Flex is also Amazon Alexa compatible and allows you to ask Alexa to start or stop a charging session for your car.

You can ask it if your car is plugged in or not or how many miles of range has been added in this last charging session. You can also ask Alexa how much you’ve spent on charging your EV this month which is definitely a good feature.

Eligible to Participate In Utility Demand Response Programs – You can also participate in Utility Demand Response Programs with the ChargePoint Home Flex charger, which can be very beneficial.

You give your utility the ability to shift the time your EV charges, and in doing so, you get a discounted electricity rate. Sometimes it’s a big discount.

Although there aren’t very many demand response programs available today, there’s going to be moving forward within the next few years.

So having a charger that can participate in these programs could save you money down the road.

Not capable of Power Sharing – Power sharing means that you can use more than one charger and share a single circuit.

The ChargePoint Home Flex cannot do that. You’d have to buy a second unit and then run a second circuit if you wanted to charge two electric cars.

Drawbacks – There is one potential issue we can see with the ChargePoint app.

It will only allow one ChargePoint Home Flex unit per account, so if you have two EVs and you buy two ChargePoint Home Flex units, you can’t have them both on the same account.

You’ll need to use a new email address to set up a new ChargePoint account

There is another issue. ChargePoint also requires you to enter your credit card information when you open an account. 

That’s because the same account you use for your ChargePoint Home Flex will also be used for any public charging. That’s the only little bit of a negative.

Most apps don’t require you to put in a credit card, just to start an account. For ChargePoint Home Flex, it doesn’t charge anything on your account but it’s there in case you need to make a payment. It’s already set up in your account.

Support, Safety Certified and Warranty

24/7 Support – They provide 24/7 customer support.

Safety Certified – The ChargePoint Home Flex is safety certified for electrical safety. It’s UL listed.

Warranty – The ChargePoint Home Flex has a 3-year warranty. The electric vehicle charging station that has less than a one-year warranty.

If the manufacturer doesn’t have the confidence in their product to give at least a one-year warranty, it’s probably not well built.

TIPS

As the Home Flex is NEMA 3 rating with a price of more than $650, it might go beyond some EV owners’ budget.

Therefore, if you live in a mild climate area, are looking for a smart EV charger delivering high power, like 50 amps, and have the budget to cover the cost of the ChargePoint Home Flex, you should definitely mark the Home Flex charger on your list.

If you own both Tesla and non-Tesla electric cars, the ChargePoint Home Flex charger with an adapter will suit your charging needs perfectly.

Best Nissan LEAF Chargers

Best Nissan LEAF Chargers

The 2021 Nissan LEAF comes in two different battery sizes: the 40-kWh battery pack with a driving range of 149 miles and the 62-kWh with a range of 226 miles.

The accepting power of the on-board charger is 6.6 kW, which means that the maximum power that the Nissan LEAF can obtain is 6.6 kW.

Owning a Nissan LEAF without a home charger is possible, but it’s super inconvenient. Of course, you can charge your Nissan LEAF on public charging stations, but you have to spend time finding places to charge. 

Charging a Nissan LEAF at home is super easy, and there are plenty of options. What kind of Nissan LEAF chargers may suit your needs based on a couple of factors, such as your daily travel patterns, your budget, one or more than one EV you have, etc.

Even though you only own an old Nissan LEAF that has a 3.3 kW on-board charger, and a 16 amp charger on a 110V or 240V outlet would be enough, for future-proofing, a higher-powered Level 2 Nissan LEAF charger would be better, as you may purchase one more EV that could charge a lot faster than what your Nissan LEAF can in the future.

Now let’s take a look at the best Nissan LEAF charging stations.

The Grizzle-E home EV charger, made in Canada, comes in different options: 40 amps, 32 amps, 24 amps, or 16 amps. It’s adjustable.

This charger is really meant purely, just to charge your car, unlike some other chargers that have smart features, for example, connecting to an Alexa or having a mobile app where you can track your charge and things like that. 

This charger sells on amazon for 449 dollars. At that price, this is a fantastic value in a really great charger. 

There are other chargers on the market that are much more expensive, and they do have some additional bells and whistles such as smart features and things like that, but if you’re looking for just a really durable well-built charger for your Nissan LEAF, the Grizzl-E is a great value. 

Pros:

– Cheaper than other EV chargers on the market

– Nice aesthetics

– Compact design

– Well-built and durable

– The cable is 24 feet long, and it’s fairly flexible.

– Fast charging speed

– NEMA 4 rating

– It’s backed by a three-year manufacturer warranty, and it’s UL certified.

 Cons:

– Easy to be stolen outdoors

– A dumb EV charger

2. JuiceBox Charger – Best Cost Effective EV Charger

If you are looking for a very good quality charging station that puts out a lot of power and charges your Nissan LEAF really quickly, the JuiceBox charger is the one to get.

The JuiceBox 32 amp charging station delivers 7.6 kW of power, which is suitable for a Nissan LEAF with the 6.6 kW on-board charger.

However, if you want to future proof your drive, the pro 40 amp version is recommended because you may purchase a Tesla or another EV which is probably built to have more than 10 kW on-board charger.

They offer 32-amp, 40-amp and 48-amp models. But for now, only the 40-amp and the 32-amp models are available on Amazon.

Pros:

– Fantastic build quality

– NEMA 4 rating

– It’s easy to install and use

– The charger is power adjustable

– It’s power share capable, which means that you can charge two EVs with two JuiceBox chargers on only one circuit at the same time

Cons:

– The app is not stable sometimes.

3. Wallbox Pulsar Plus Charger – Most Portable Charger

The Wallbox Pulsar Plus charger is one of the smallest chargers on the market for now. The 40-amp charger delivers around 9.6 kW of power output.

You can adjust the power rating to match with the acceptance rate of your Nissan LEAF.

The Pulsar Plus charger uses both Bluetooth and Wi-Fi connectivity so the charger is not completely reliant on the Wi-Fi or internet connection to function.

Even if you don’t have the data connection, you can still set up the charger via Bluetooth after installing the app on your phone.

Pros:

– Charges more than one EV using multiple Pulsar Plus charges on a single circuit breaker simultaneously

– Bluetooth and Wi-Fi connection

– Compact and solid design

– Over-the-air software updates

Cons:

– Errors sometimes appear as the charger is “talking to” the vehicle

4. ChargePoint Home Flex Charger – Most Powerful Charger

ChargePoint is a large company. The ChargePoint Home Flex charger is one of their products.

The ChargePoint Home Flex is very flexible on how you figure this electrically. Basically, this charger will charge all the way up to 50 amps.

You can just plug it directly into a NEMA 14-50 and just use it as is or you can kind of downgrade it into a different configuration if you have a 40 amp or 20 amp or lower breaker.

For a Nissan LEAF with a 3.3 kW on-board charger, 16 amps are all you need to charge. So you can just configure it as a 16 amp charger for now.

In the future, if you buy another car, you can upgrade the charger and the service to your garage. 

Pros:

– Stylish design and nice look

– Delivers up to 50 amps of power

– Time scheduling feature so you can charge your Nissan LEAF during off-peak hours when the rates are cheaper

– There’s also a reminder where you can have it send you a notification to plug your car in 

– About the app, you can view the historical data as well

– The charger is backed with a three-year parts replacement warranty.

Cons:

– More expensive than other chargers on the market

– Errors occur sometimes

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How Much Does it Cost to Charge an Electric Car?

How Much Does it Cost to Charge an Electric Car?

Introduction

How much does it cost to charge an electric car? We’re going to run some numbers and find out.

There are three different categories of electric car charging: home charging, DC fast charging and Supercharging.

In reality, you won’t charge at any single of these exclusively, and it’ll probably be a mix of these depending on where you are able to plug in, how efficient you drive, what kind of EV you’re driving, the efficiency of your EV, so how much you spend on charging can vary a lot.

This article will tell you how much it costs to charge an electric car on average in the United States, electric car savings comparied with gasolined-powered vehicle in fuel costs, factors affecting the cost to charge an EV and also some tips to reduce the cost.

Of course, you can play with our EV charging cost calculator for your specific electric car to see what your costs might be directly.

How Much to Charge an Electric Car in General?

In general, the average charging efficiency is 90%, which means if you take 10 kWh from the grid, your electric car is only able to use about 9 kWh.

This is just due to energy losses while charging. Things like heat, light and just internal charging losses are wasted and don’t end up making their way into the battery.

Therefore, if you want to fill up the entire battery, the battery capacity is what your car needs, but the actual amount of energy you get from the grid, which is battery capacity divided by 90%, is more than the figure of the battery capacity.

Cost to Charge an Electric Car from 10% to 80% of State of Charge

Let’s run some numbers as a general rule of thumb.

For example, if we charge a Tesla Model 3 Long Range (2021) from 10% to 80% of charge level, the battery capacity is 82 kWh, so the actual amount of the energy from the grid comes out to be 91 kWh (82 kWh x (0.8-0.1) / 0.9 = 63.78 kWh).

According to eia, for home charging, the national electricity cost is about 13 cents per kWh of electricity in the United States as of February 2021.

It might be a little bit more or a little bit less depending on where you live.

So it would cost around $8.29 to charge a battery from 10% to 80% ( 63.78 kWh x $ 0.13/kWh = $11.84).

For public DC fast charging, it gets a little more difficult to estimate. Because some are completely free, some charge per hour, some charge per kWh so it can get a little confusing depending on what kind of charger you are using.

Typically, it’s more expensive than charging at home unless you use free charging stations, of course. If you do a little bit more hunting, you can charge your electric car completely for free because there are a ton of free ones out there.

Generally, most chargers average between 15 cents per kWh and 30 cents per kWh. Let’s use the average 22 cents per kWh to do the calculation.

The cost would be $14.03 for a full charge ( 63.78 kWh x $ 0.22/kWh = $14.03), more expensive than charging with home EV chargers.

Generally, what you use for Tesla fast charging is probably Supercharging.

In the United States, the average cost of supercharging is about 28 cents per kWh, so it would cost you $17.86 to charge your car fully (63.78 kWh x $ 0.28/kWh = $17.86).

In comparison, home charging is the cheapest way, which is fortunate because that is where a majority of EV charging actually takes place.

Most people just come home from work or whatever they are doing throughout the day, plug in their car and let it charge overnights, and it’s all charged up when they’re ready to go in the morning.

Cost to Charge an Electric Car Based on Desired Distance

The average person drives around 30 miles/day, so we use 30 miles as the desired driving distance.

A lot of electric cars will go about 4 miles per kWh of electricity.

So it costs about  3 and 1/4 cents to operate a car per mile (13 cents/kWh ÷ 4miles/kWh = 3 and 1/4 cents/mile) and around 97.5 cents to charge to get 30 miles of driving distance.

Those are the costs for charging at home, and the costs would be almost doubled if you used a public DC fast charging station.

Electric Car Savings in General

Charging your electric car at home is more affordable than filling up on gas, so switching from conventional gasoline-powered vehicles to electric cars will save you money on fuel costs.

Let’s compare the cost of gasoline versus electricity.

electricity-vs-gas

Cost for a Gallon of Electricity

In the United States, the average passenger drives 25 miles/gallon  and let’s run this number up and use 30 mile/gallon to do the comparison.

So if we can go 30 miles on one gallon of gasoline, then what would it take to go with the same distance in an electric car.

Typically, we would need about 7.5 kWh (30 miles ÷ 4 miles/kWh = 7.5 kWh) to go that same distance and if we multiply that 7.5 kWh times 13 cents per kWh, we get 97.5 cents or basically a dollar per gallon equivalent.

Therefore, the electricity costs a buck per gallon, which is super cheaper than the price of gasoline.

It’s really a great way to go electric over gasoline when you’re just purely looking at the fuel costs. 

We’re using average numbers, which may be higher or lower in your area, of course.

Electric Car Savings in Fuel Costs

According to US Department of Transportation, the average person drives around 13,000 miles yearly.

To make the comparison consistent, we still use the 30 miles per gallon as the average efficiency.

According  AAA, the average national gasoline price is $2.51 as of Feb.16, 2021.

The gas cost would be $1087.67 yearly (13,000 miles per year / 30 miles per gallon x $ 2.51 per gallon = $1087.67/year).

electric-car-savings-in-fuel-costs

For simplicity and easy understanding, the estimates below are obtained based on an electric car charging at home exclusively.

On average, electric cars go around 4 miles per kWh of electricity.

The electricity price averages 13 cents a kWh in the US, so the electricity cost would reach $469.44 per year (13,000 miles per year / 4 miles per kWh x $0.13 per kWh = $469.44 per year).

The savings in fuel costs of running an electric car would be $618.23 yearly ($1087.67/year-$469.44/year= $618.23/year), which is a big saving by switching to an electric car.

Factors Influencing Cost to Charge an Electric Car

How much you spend on charging an electric car can vary a lot, depending on the electricity cost in your area, the car you are driving, how big the battery pack is on it, your driving style, how efficient your car is and even the weather, etc.

In winter, an electric car will be a little less efficient because the battery system needs the energy to keep warm, so it will cost you a little more to “fuel” your car, but still a lot less than a gasoline-powered car.

Tips to Reduce Cost to Charge an Electric Car

Utility Demand Response Programs

When you use electricity to power your car, most electricity utilities offer Utility Demand Response Programs.

The way it works is that it costs you different amounts of money when you charge your car during different parts of the day.

It’s typically divided into two parts of the day: on-peak and off-peak periods.

Generally, on-peak rates being during the day are more expensive than off-peak rates being during nights and weekends as well.

Sometimes, the electricity price at off-peak times could be half as much as that at on-peak periods, which means that you can essentially charge your car using 50 cents per gallon of electricity.

These demand response programs make electric car drivers take advantage of lower rates because most EV drivers charge their cars at night.

Most electric cars or smart home EV chargers have a feature of time scheduling.

Through this feature, you can schedule the time to charge your electric car and save you with off-peak rates.

You could set it to 10 o’clock or midnight or whatever you’d like it to be.

By comparison, it doesn’t work for gasoline-powered vehicle drivers.

Solar Panels

Another way to reduce the cost of charging an electric car is to set up some solar panels.

As long as there is sunshine, solar panels can make power. It’s really a great way to be able to make your own motor fuel.

solar-panels

Even though you need to pay for the upfront fee, including the original capital outlay for paying for equipment and the installation cost, sometimes it could be three or four thousand dollars which is a lot, you don’t have to pay for the electricity, and all your electricity would be legitimately free.

Best Home Chargers for Tesla

Best Home Chargers for Tesla

A lot of people are asking questions, like what should they tell their electrician to install before they get their Tesla? Can they just get by with their mobile charger that came with their car? Do they need a Tesla Wall Connector? Is it a need to get a non-Tesla home charger?

Most Tesla drivers on the road today may have used their mobile connectors since day one and they are totally happy with it. It does the job day in and day out.

However, that doesn’t mean you won’t want another home charger such as the Tesla Wall Connector or even a non-Tesla home charger.

Actually, the options available for charging your Tesla at home are personal to the individual.

It really depends on many different variables, such as how often you drive, how far you drive, how much battery you need each morning when you wake up, etc.

This article will tell you some pros and cons of the best home charging stations for Tesla vehicles and who may benefit from upgrading.

mobile connector1

Every Tesla, such as Tesla Model 3, Model S, Model X, and Model Y, comes with a Tesla Mobile Connector for home charging.

On delivery day, the mobile charger is either in the trunk or the front. More than likely, your delivery specialist shows you where it is and tells you about it.

There is one NEMA 5-15 adapter that comes and will work with the mobile charger. The adapter is just a standard plug that connects to 110-volt standard household outlets.

You’re going to get anywhere from three to four maybe five or seven miles of range per hour of charging. If you charge for 10 hours, you can hope for 40 or 50 miles of range, and that’s a long time to charge to get so little.

If you want to charge your Tesla from 10% to 80% of state of charge, it takes more than 40 hours to get that purpose (Use our EV Charging Time Calculator to estimate your Tesla vehicle charge time).

But you don’t need to do anything else, just plugging one end into a wall and the other end into your Tesla, and then charging starts!

PROS
  • Extremely convenient

  • No extra costs

  • Easy to use

  • Very useful in case of emergency when on road trips and away from home

CONS
  • Slow charging speed

  • You need to pack it in and unpack it often

TIPS

If you drive your Tesla mainly for daily commutes (30 miles on average), the standard Tesla Mobile Connector might be all you need for regular daily charging.

Because it takes around 4-8 hours to get that range for Tesla vehicles, and you just plug in your Tesla once getting home from work and charge your car overnight, and your Tesla will cover your commutes again the next morning.

2. Tesla Mobile Connector – NEMA 14-50 Adapter

You can get a NEMA 14-50, a hugely popular adapter that looks very similar to the 5-15. They are both adapters that work with the mobile charger.

However, the 14-50 is more like the dryer plug that’s in your house if you have an electric dryer. Or you have your electrician install a NEMA 14-50 outlet near your car.

The NEC (National Electrical Code) dictates that when you are pulling a continuous load on an electrical circuit, you can only pull 80% of that maximum so that you can make sure not to cause a fire basically.

mobile connector1

So that the NEMA 14-50 is capable of charging on a 50-amp circuit, but the car actually only charges at 40 amps.

The adapter allows you to charge your Tesla at about 30 miles of range per hour on a Model 3, Model S, and Model Y potentially, and 22 miles per hour on a Model X (Use our EV Charging Time Calculator to estimate your Tesla vehicle charging speed).

PROS
  • Portable

  • Fast charging speed

  • Easy to use

  • Very useful in case of emergency when on road trips and away from home

CONS
  • You may need to upgrade the outlets

  • NEMA 14-50 cost

  • You need to pack it in and unpack it often

TIPS

If you want to charge your Tesla faster, you just need to purchase a 45 US dollar NEMA 14-50 adapter on Tesla’s website.

The adapter charges your Tesla five times faster than the standard 5-15 plug.

It’s as fast as the standard range (Plus) Model 3 can charge.

If you have greater than six hours to charge each night, you Tesla can get to 60%-80% of charge level or even to be full from 10% the next morning, and you don’t really need to charge faster.

Especially if you already have a NEMA 14-50 outlet, there is no reason to upgrade.

3. Tesla Wall Connector

Tesla has offered two versions of wall connectors, and the newer version, the generation 3 has replaced the generation 2 one.

The Tesla generation 3 wall connector has Wi-Fi built-in, but this feature does not really do a lot for people today.

You can expect Tesla to add more capabilities with the Wi-Fi connected wall connectors.

The cable (18-foot length) is shorter than the second generation of 24-foot length. So the cable of the Tesla gen 3 wall charger may not reach all corners of a garage.

The wall charger can offer up to 48 amps of power.

You’re going to want to have your electrician install a 60-amp circuit for the Tesla Wall Connector, so it will give you the maximum speed that your Tesla can handle for except for the Tesla Model 3 Standard Range (Plus).

The wall connector charges your Tesla at about 45 miles of range per hour on a Model 3 (except for Standard Range and Plus), Model S, and Model Y, while 33 miles per hour on a Model X (Use our EV Charging Time Calculator to estimate your Tesla vehicle charging speed).

Compared with the mobile charger with a 14-50 plug, it’s not a huge difference. But for those that like to drive, come home, charge, go back out and drive immediately. It can make all the difference in the world.

PROS
  • Permanent install aesthetic look

  • Fast charging speed

  • Power share capability

  • Easy to use

  • Flexible to leave the mobile charger in the car just for use when on road trips and away from home

CONS
  • Cable length shorter than 20 feet

  • Installation is expensive in a lot of areas

  • It takes up more space in the garage

TIPS

If you do real estate or if you do kind of business where you’re going back and forth to your house, and you’re constantly running errands, you need that charge to be faster.

The mobile connector may not be fast enough, and the wall connector may be giving you just that a bit of an edge of about 10 or 15 miles of range more per hour, but it makes a difference. The Tesla Wall Connector might suit you.

If you want to keep the mobile charger in the car for use on the road or when visiting your relatives, and don’t want to take it out, an extra wall connector installed on the wall for use at home might be a good option.

If you have more than one Tesla at home and want to share one connector, the wall connector is a good choice because the wall connector is going to be able to load share to multiple cars.

If you want to have multiple home chargers to share one circuit, the wall connector can also be a good charger.

Or if you just want cool stuff and you are drawn to the look and the permanent feel of a charger installed in your garage, the wall connector is the perfect pick for your Tesla.

Best Non-Tesla Home Charging Stations for Tesla Model 3 S X & Y

There are other brands that make home chargers for electric vehicles. You don’t have to buy the one that comes from Tesla.

The third-party brand home chargers are all roughly the same price range between four and six hundred dollar range.

They all do similar things. Some may have a few extra features than Tesla chargers, and what you really need to think about is if the charger charges your car fast and safely.

TIPS

If you have more than one electric vehicle, both Tesla and non-Tesla EVs at home, a third-party EV home charging station is highly recommended.

For charging Tesla vehicles with a third-party home charger, a J1772 to Tesla charging adapter will be needed.

Because Tesla uses a proprietary connector, and the connector is not the industry standard J1772 that all of the other electric cars in North America use.

A J1772 to Tesla adapter allows you to go from any other charging provider to a Tesla vehicle.

So there will be more motions to charge your Tesla, such as take the adapter out of the car, connect the adapter to the home charger, plug it in the Tesla, etc. It might not be a problem for most people.

We’re going to pick the 4 best home chargers for Tesla on the market now, and will update the information regularly as there are so many updates going on in this industry.

1. JuiceBox EV Charger (Our Top Pick) – Best Non-Tesla Home Charger Overall

Dimensions (without cable): 18.6″ x 7.6″ x 5.6″ | Cable Length: 25ft | Voltage: 240V | Amperage: 32A or 40A or 48A | Maximum Power Output: 7.7kW or 9.6kW or 11.5kW | Weatherproof Rating: NEMA 4X | Charging Type: J1772 Plug (NEMA 14-50 or Hardwire) | Smart or Non-Smart Charger: Smart Charger | Connectivity: Wi-Fi | Voice Control: Amazon Alexa and Google Assistant

If you own only a Tesla, the JuiceBox home charger is not recommended and getting the Tesla gen 3 charger which is both less expensive and charges faster, is the right way.

However, if you have both a Tesla and a non-Tesla electric vehicle, for example, a Nissan Leaf or a Chevy Bolt, this is definitely an excellent option for a home charger for you.

The Enel X offers two options of JuiceBox home charger: plug-in and hardwire versions.

The plug-in model uses a NEMA 14-50 standard dryer outlet with a 25-foot long charging cable, which is a great option if your car is parked far from where your charger is mounted, and you need the additional cable length.

They offer 32-amp, 40-amp and 48-amp models. But for now, only the 40-amp and the 32-amp models are available on Amazon.

You can charge your Tesla at about 30 miles per hour with the 40-amp version. As you increase in the state of charge of the battery, the charge rate may decrease a little bit which is common with lithium-ion batteries.

It’s easy to install, set up and use. The build quality on the product seems nice, solid and durable.

The charging handle of the JuiceBox home charger is also nice and lightweight and feels natural in your hand with a comfortable ergonomic grip to it.

The mobile app is user-friendly and allows you to control, monitor and schedule any charge right from your mobile app no matter where you are.

It’s energy star certified for energy efficiency. The NEMA 4 rated enclosure and power share capability are the important features of the JuiceBox charger.

PROS
  • Aesthetically pleasing design

  • Power adjustable

  • Power share capable

  • NEMA 4 rating

  • 25-foot long cable

  • Easy to install, set up and use

  • Safety certified

CONS
  • The price is higher than $500

  • Installation is expensive in a lot of areas

  • Sometimes the mobile app is not stable

TIPS

The JuiceBox EV charger has the ability to charge any electric vehicle, no matter what make, model or gear.

Having that J1772 plug and the adapter for a Tesla, you can charge anything in the spectrum, the entire range of electric vehicles in North America.

2. ChargePoint Home Flex EV Charger – Highest Power Output Non-Tesla Home Charger

Dimensions (without cable): 11.19″ x 7.06″ x 7.07″ | Cable Length: 23ft | Voltage: 240V | Amperage: 16A~50A | Maximum Power Output: 12kW | Weatherproof Rating: NEMA 3R | Charging Type: J1772 Plug (NEMA 14-50 or Hardwire) | Smart or Non-Smart Charger: Smart Charger | Connectivity: Wi-Fi | Voice Control: Amazon Alexa

The ChargePoint Home Flex EV charger is considered to be a Level 2 charger, and it charges at 240 volts. 

There are essentially three electrical configurations for this charger, so you can either plug it in with a NEMA 14-50 plug and NEMA 6-50 plug or directly hardwire the unit.

According to the 80% draw rule, when you plug the unit in and charge your EV on a 50-amp circuit breaker, you can actually only get a maximum of 40 amps out of the unit.

The only way to get the full 50 amps is you hardwire the charger. Or you purchase a NEMA 14-60 plug, and plug it in and charge your vehicle on a 60-amp breaker, and then you will get 48 amps.

However, for safety reasons, it’s better and safer to hardwire the Home Flex charger if you want to get 48 or 50 amps.

The charger can get up to 37 miles of range per hour, which is pretty fast. It takes less than one hour to get 30 miles using the Home Flex charger for Tesla Model 3 S X & Y.

The general aesthetics of the product are really nice. It has a sleek design, and having that hook feature in order to wrap the cable around is definitely an added bonus.

The charging cable itself is 23 feet long, so it allows you to reach your car even if it’s fairly far away.

Another thing to note about this charger is that it has a nice storage location for the handle that actually pivots, and this makes it easier to both insert the handle and remove it from the charger.

In addition, the Home Flex is a smart home charger, and the mobile app is very easy to set up, and it has a lot of functionality built into the app that are user-friendly.

PROS
  • Sleek design

  • Power adjustable

  • NEMA 3 rating

  • Easy to install and use

  • Safety certified

CONS
  • The price is higher than $500

  • Sometimes the mobile app is not stable

TIPS

For all Tesla vehicles, such as Model 3, Model S, Model X and Model Y, the ChargePoint Home Flex charger with an adapter can charge very fast and meet your needs.

3. Wallbox Pulsar Plus Level 2 EV Charger – Most Compact Non-Tesla Home Charger

Dimensions (without cable): 7.8″ x 7.9″ x 3.9″ | Cable Length: 25ft | Voltage: 240V | Amperage: 6A~40A | Maximum Power Output: 9.6kW | Weatherproof Rating: NEMA 4 | Charging Type: J1772 Plug (NEMA 14-50 or Hardwire) | Smart or Non-Smart Charger: Smart Charger | Connectivity: Wi-Fi and Bluetooth | Voice Control: Amazon Alexa and Google Assistant

The Pulsar Plus EV Charger is made by Wallbox, a European company based in Barcelona, Spain.

The Pulsar Plus charger is their best-selling product in Europe because it’s a super-connected product.

It’s connected with Google Home, the Alexa, so you can set it to charge.

They also have an Apple Watch app where you can use your different views, your different stats, obviously.

The charger is a 40-amp unit that charges at 240 volts, so it’s capable of 9.6-kilowatt output on a 50-amp circuit. It also has the ability to adjust the power from 6 amps to 40 amps.

In terms of design, the Pulsar Plus is super compact. It has a nice curvaceous style, while the glossy finish adds to the overall high-quality look. The build quality is excellent.

The Wallbox Pulsar Plus has a remote connector holster, so you can mount it wherever you like. But the cable is stiff and doesn’t feel quite as bendable.

In terms of the app, the Wallbox Pulsar Plus has an easy-to-use app, and the app accepts over-the-air software updates.

You can lock the charger via the app so nobody else can use it.

The charger is both Wi-Fi enabled, and Bluetooth enabled. It’s Wi-Fi enabled with the Pulsar Plus so it can download updates to improve the performance of the unit.

It’s Bluetooth enabled, so you can still monitor your charger when the internet is down.

It’s also able to power-sharing. You can run two or more Pulsar Plus chargers on one circuit to charge two EVs simultaneously.

PROS
  • Extremely convenient

  • Compact stylish design

  • Power share capable

  • NEMA 4 rating

  • Over-the-air software updates

  • Easy to install and use

  • Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connection

  • Safety certified

CONS
  • The price is higher than $500

  • Not energy star certified yet

  • Sometimes the mobile app is not stable

TIPS

The Pulsar Plus Level 2 EV charger can charge any electric vehicle in North America, including Tesla vehicles, so whatever EV you have, if you’re interested in the Pulsar Plus, it will charge that vehicle.

4. Grizzl-E Level 2 EV Charger – Most Robust and Affordable Non-Smart Non-Tesla Home Charger

Dimensions (without cable): 15″ x 12″ x 9.5″ | Cable Length: 24ft | Voltage: 240V | Amperage: 16/24/32/40A | Maximum Power Output: 9.6kW | Weatherproof Rating: NEMA 4 | Charging Type: J1772 Plug (NEMA 14-50 or Hardwire) | Smart or Non-Smart Charger: Non-Smart Charger

The Grizzl-E level 2 EV charger is the most robust and affordable EV home charger on the market.

Everything is done in Canada, and parts are coming from the USA.

The manufacturer made the PCB (Printed Circuit Board) as one solid piece without any moving parts, a very well-engineered board.

The reason for that is to prolong the life of the board because any moving part inside the board will cause problems with time.

The PCB and the charger are supposed to last for ten years.

The outer casing of the charger is made of solid aluminum alloy, which is actually a NEMA 4 airtight and watertight enclosure.

The reason for that kind of enclosure is to protect the PCB (Printed Circuit Board) that is inside the charger, from moisture and temperature changes.

They offer the charger that includes a NEMA 6-50 or 14-50 plug with a 24-foot cable.

One of the most important features of the Grizzl-E charger is the ability to set different currents using a switch dip.

You can select different current output from 16, 24, 32, and 40 amps. The power output could be up to 9.6 kW.

The charger has a cUL certification label for electrical safety, which is recognized by all authorities in both the USA and Canada.

It also has a three-year full replacement warranty.

PROS
  • NEMA 4 rating

  • Power adjustable

  • For both indoor and outdoor use

  • Fast charging speed

  • 24-foot long cable

  • Easy to install and use

  • Safety certified

CONS
  • Non-smart home charger

TIPS

For most Tesla vehicles except for the Model 3 Standard Range (Plus), the 40-amp power can be delivered. If you are looking for an alternative home charger that you just want to plug in and charge your Model 3, Model S, Model X or Model Y vehicle, the Grizzl-E charger might be your best option.

How Much Does It Cost to Charge a Tesla?

How Much Does It Cost to Charge a Tesla?

Introduction

How Much Does It Cost to Charge a Tesla?

The answer depends on a couple of factors, such as the state of charge, the battery’s usable storage capacity, the battery pack’s age, the car you own, the car’s efficiency, the electricity cost in your area, and even the temperature outside, etc.

Tesla Model 3

As a cost-effective Tesla vehicle, the Tesla Model 3 has some features that attract many people. It has extensive driving ranges while affordable prices. The sleek styling is also one of the highlights.

Since 2018, the Tesla Model 3 has been the top-selling all electric cars on the market in the United States.

According to the EPA test, the Model 3 has an estimated driving range of 263 miles for the Standard Range Plus, 315 miles for the Performance, and 353 miles for the Long Range version.

tesla-model-3
tesla-model-s

Tesla Model S

The Tesla Model S, an electric luxury sedan, has come a long way since its debut in 2012. As of today, the refresh has happened a lot.

In terms of battery and range for 2021, the battery pack lies under the Tesla vehicle’s floor and makes the front and the rear bear an evenly distributed weight.

The Driving Range of the Model S varies from version to version. The Long Range model offers up to 412 miles of range, while the Plaid version can drive up to 390 miles between charges, and the Plaid+ version extends the range to 520 miles of driving per single charge.

The Tesla Model S has become a good alternative to gasoline-powered vehicles when for a long journey because of its long driving range. The range anxiety can be gone.

Tesla Model X

The all-electric Tesla Model X emits zero CO2, and you don’t have to drive your car to a gas station while you need to charge your Model X.

Charging up at home or on the road will incur some costs, much less than the gas costs.

The Model X has two models for 2021, Plaid and Long Range. The Plaid model manages 340 miles of driving range, while the Long Range drives up to 360 miles of range per single charge.

The Model X has a very impressive battery pack capacity which is 100 kWh.

tesla-model-x
tesla-model-y

Tesla Model Y

The Tesla Model Y is a high-performance SUV that is based on the Model 3 platform. It is available in two versions: Long Range and Performance AWD. The Long Range trim offers 326 miles of the EPA estimated driving range, while the Performance model comes with a lower range, 303 miles. 

A cheaper Model Y with 244 miles of driving range was announced to launch, but then it was canceled because of its low driving range. 

The Model Y comes with a 75 kWh battery pack, and you can charge the Model Y both at home and on the road.

This article will walk you through the cost to charge your Tesla Model 3 both at home and when you take a road trip in general as an example. We will also explain the parameters that why we use in the formulas.

To find out more costs of charging other Tesla vehicles, you can use our tesla charging cost calculator to estimate the charging cost for your specific situation.

Charging Options for Tesla Vehicles

Home Charging Stations for Tesla

One of the things that people are really concerned about with Tesla vehicles is how I charge them. We’ll take you through four different options for charging your Tesla vehicles at home.

1. Tesla Mobile Connector – NEMA 5-15 Adapter

Every Tesla comes with a standard Tesla Mobile Connector with a NEMA 5-15 plug included. It connects to a regular 110-volt household outlet, which is the lowest level of charging that you can get with the car.

mobile connector1

It’s just a matter of taking your mobile adapter, plugging one end into the household outlet and the other side into your car.

But what kind of power can we get into the car? It appears that we are getting about five miles per hour of charge for the Tesla Model 3.

2. Tesla Mobile Connector – NEMA 14-50 Adapter

If you want faster charging, the next step up from a 110-volt outlet would be a 240-volt outlet that you might find in your house with a dryer outlet or sometimes called a 14-50 adapter.

It has the same process: after plugging the adapter in the mobile charger, plug one end into the wall and the other end into your car.

The power can ramp up to 32 amps, or about 36 miles per hour, with the NEMA 14-50 adapter.

3. Tesla Wall Connector

The third charging option at home is the Tesla Wall Connector. For some people, the reason why they purchase the wall connector is twofold.

One thing, the state where they live has a rebate available to them from the power company that allows them to get a rebate on installing a Tesla Wall Connector.

The rebate pretty much just pays for the wall connector itself, and all they have to do is pay for an additional installation cost.

The second thing is that they want to keep the mobile connector and cord in the car all the time.

tesla-gen-3-wall-connector ev charger

They don’t want to be able to have to remember to take it with them if they were leaving for a long journey or leaving it in the garage.

How much power you get out of the wall connector really depends on what kind of circuit you have it hooked to.

If you install a 60-amp circuit, you will get the maximum amount of power, 48 amps.

The power ramps up to about 45 miles per hour.

4. Third-party Charging Stations

When you don’t have Tesla chargers nearby, the third-party charging stations can also be used to charge your Tesla.

Third-party Level 2 chargers are compatible with the J1772 plugs. While with a J1772 to Tesla Charging Adapter, you can power your Tesla with any third-party chargers.

The J1772 chargers deliver up to 48 amps or 50 amps, which means the charging speed for a Tesla  may also be up to 45 miles per hour of charging theoretically.

You can use our Tesla charge time calculator or see our article Tesla charge time to get the charge speed.

Public Charging Stations for Tesla

The primary charging option for Tesla vehicles is the Tesla Supercharging network, of course.

So far, the V3 Superchargers are very rare around the country, while the V2 Superchargers which is the most common Superchargers have been distributed in many locations.

Tesla-v2-supercharger
tesla_supercharger_v3

Generally speaking, the public DC fast charging stations have CHAdeMO or CSS ports, while Tesla vehicles have proprietary ports.

If you want to charge your Tesla vehicle on a third-party public charging station, a CHAdeMO to Tesla or CCS 1 to Tesla adapter will be needed while the charging rate will be much slower than on a Tesla Supercharger.

Electricity Rates for Charging

Electricity Rate at Home

Charging your Tesla at home can be one of the cheapest ways, but it’s really dependent on where you live and when you charge your car.

The electricity cost varies widely across the country. As of February 2021, the average domestic electricity rate in the United States is 13 cents per kWh.

The rate can be below 10 cents per kWh in states like Idaho, Louisiana, Washington, and North Dakota, while over $0.20 in California, Connecticut, Massachusetts and Rhode Island, and in Hawaii, the rate can be even as high as 31.36 cents per kWh!

Some utilities in many states have tiered electricity rates, which means that you pay more or less beyond some certain threshold amounts of electricity.

In addition, some utilities offer Utility Demand Response Programs, which can help you save a lot of money when you charge your Tesla  during off-peak periods such as at night or on weekends, at which the rates are much lower than at on-peak times.

solar-panels

Besides, it could save a lot of money if you install solar panels at home.

Even if the cost of purchasing and installing solar system is a big upfront investment, EV owner can avoid high energy costs and save a lot in the long run.

Especially if you live in a state where the electricity rate is high, such as California, it can make a big difference.

Electricity Rate on the Road

For Tesla drivers, charging their Tesla vehicles at Superchargers is the major way when traveling long distances.

Every Tesla vehicle purchaser has 1,000 mile free credits when buying a Tesla using a valid Tesla referral code link.

Therefore, these free Supercharging credits can offset some charging costs.

As of March 18, 2021, Tesla has built a total of 986 Supercharger locations across the country.

In general, some charge by kWh, but some by time. That’s because some entities like Tesla and third-party charging stations are required to charge by time (like charge per minute, charge per hour), while utilities charge by kWh in some regions.

In these cases, the charging costs vary dependent on how long you charge your Tesla and the charging speed.

Supercharging rates vary by location. However, the flat rate for most Supercharging locations is $0.28 per kWh.

In some locations, the rate is $0.25 per minute above 60 kW and $0.13 per minute at/below 60 kW.

To a great extent, there are occasions where a Tesla vehicle may be needed to charge at third-party charging stations, such as Electrify America, EVgo and ChargePoint when there are no Superchargers nearby.

Costs vary widely across these third-party stations. The station owner set most of the prices and are sometimes charge by time, by kWh, or a mix of per-time (per-minute or per-hour charging), and per-kWh, etc.

Be sure to check the charging network apps in advance.

Cost to Charge a Tesla

If you’d like to see what your costs to charge your Tesla may look like, be sure to check your electricity bill or the website https://www.eia.gov/electricity/monthly/ to find out the electricity rate in your state.

Or check the charge rate of the Superchargers and the third-party charging stations.

You can obtain the battery capacity, and the driving range from the vehicle manufacturers’ official website or the user manual, and then use our electric vehicle charging cost calculators.

Let’s take Tesla Model 3 Long Range (2021) as an example to show the calculation.

NOTE: All results are calculated based on the theoretical assumptions, and may vary under different circumstances in real life.

Battery Capacity: 82 kWh | Driving Range: 353 miles (EPA) | The average power efficiency is 0.9 in the calculation

  1. Cost to Charge a Tesla Model 3 Long Range (2021) at Home on average across the United States (National electricity rate = $0.13/kWh)
  • Cost to charge from 10% to 80% of charge level

= [Battery capacity x (80%-10%)] ÷ 0.9 x Electricity rate

= [82 kWh x (80%-10%)] ÷ 0.9 x $0.13/kWh

= $8.29

  • Cost to charge for 30 Miles of desired distance

= Desired distance ÷ Efficiency ÷ 0.9 x Electricity rate

= 30 miles ÷ 4.30 miles/kWh ÷ 0.9 x $0.13/kWh

= $1.01

  • Cost per mile

          = Electricity rate ÷ (Efficiency x 0.9)

= $0.13/kWh ÷ (4.30 miles/kWh x 0.9)

= $0.03

2. Cost to Charge a Tesla Model 3 Long Range (2021) at Home on average across the United States (National electricity rate = $0.28/kWh)

  • Cost to charge from 10% to 80% of charge level

= [Battery capacity x (80%-10%)] ÷ 0.9 x Electricity rate

= [82 kWh x (80%-10%)] ÷ 0.9 x $0.28/kWh

= $17.86

  • Cost to charge for 30 Miles of desired distance

= Desired distance ÷ Efficiency ÷ 0.9 x Electricity rate

= 30 miles ÷ 4.30 miles/kWh ÷ 0.9 x $0.28/kWh

= $2.17

  • Cost per mile

= Electricity rate ÷ (Efficiency x 0.9)

= $0.28/kWh ÷ (4.30 miles/kWh x 0.9)

= $0.07

The costs to charge a Tesla on the road almost double that at home.

Use our Cost to Charge Electric Car Calculator to calculate how much it costs to charge your Tesla at home versus a gas car yearly in your state and see how much savings it could be switching from a gas car to a Tesla.

How Long Does It Take to Charge a Tesla?

How Long Does It Take to Charge a Tesla?

Introduction

How Long Does It Take to Charge a Tesla? The answer varies from several minutes to several days.

A couple of things affect the charging speed, such as the type and power output of the charger, the battery’s storage capacity, the acceptance rate of the on-board charger, how full or empty the battery is, and even environmental parameters like the outside temperature, etc.

In terms of charging options, you can charge your Tesla vehicles at home using a Level 2 charger.

In some cases, your car can also be charged at 1.4 kW using the Tesla mobile connector via a regular household outlet. 

However, it will not be safe charging your car and placing the maximum load on the socket for a charge-up (10% to 80%), since this charge can take up to 44 hours for Model 3, 54 hours for both Model S and Model X, 40 hours for Model Y.

But if you plug in to charge whenever you park, just like you charge your phone, the mobile connector may meet your needs. 

With a battery capacity of 82 kWh (Model 3 Performance and Long Range, 2021), you can charge your Tesla from 10% to 80% of state of charge for about 5 hours and 33 minutes using Tesla Gen 3 Wall Connector and only about 16 minutes through V3 Supercharging (250 kW of power) which is super fast indeed.    

As you can see, the Tesla Gen 3 Wall Charger (one type of Level 2 charging station) enables you not only to charge your Tesla Model 3 safely, but also almost 8 times as quickly as using the Level 1 charger.

Tesla Model 3

As of today, the Tesla Model 3 is Tesla’s most affordable and best-selling car.

The production of the Tesla Model 3 started in July 2017 and the technology and productivity have been highly enhanced.

The Tesla Model 3 (2021) has 3 different versions: Standard Range Plus, Long Range, and Performance.

tesla-model-3

The on-board charger of the Standard Range Plus was built to accept 7.6 kW of maximum AC charging power, which means that when connected to a Level 2 charger with a power rating above 7.6 kW, the Tesla Model 3 will only be capable of accepting up to 7.6 kW.

In addition, 11.5kW is the maximum power that the other two versions of Model 3 can charge at.

Depending on your driving style, the road condition, the season, air conditioning system, and seat heating, etc., the driving range of the Tesla Model 3 can reach up to 263 miles (Standard Range Plus), 315 miles (Performance), and 353 miles (Long Range).

tesla-model-s

Tesla Model S

The Tesla Model S used to have a version of the on-board dual charger that can accept up to 22 kW of power.

For safety reasons, however, the double charger has been discontinued and succeeded by the standard single charger that can obtain up to 11.5 kW and the optional single charger capable of accepting 16.5 kW.

The Tesla Model S (2021) is available in three different versions: Plaid, Long Range, Plaid+.

And the on-board charger of these three versions was built to accept 11.5 kW of maximum AC charging power, which means that when connected to a Level 2 charger with a power rating above 11.5 kW, the Tesla Model S will only be capable of accepting up to 11.5 kW.

The Tesla Model S has the longest range in comparison with any other electric car on the market.

Depending on your driving style, the road condition, the season, air conditioning system, and seat heating, etc., the driving range of the Tesla Model S can reach up to 390 miles (Plaid), 412 miles (Long Range), and 520 miles (Plaid+).

Tesla Model X

The Tesla Model X (2021) has 2 different versions: Plaid, and Long Range.

The on-board charger of the Tesla Model X was built to accept 16.5 kW of maximum AC charging power as standard, which means that when connected to a Level 2 charger with a power rating above 16.5 kW, the Tesla Model X will only be capable of accepting up to 16.5 kW.

tesla-model-x

Depending on your driving style, the road condition, the season, air conditioning system, and seat heating, etc., the driving range of the Tesla Model X can reach up to 340 miles (Plaid), and 360 miles (Long Range).

tesla-model-y

Tesla Model Y

The Tesla Model Y was prepared to exist in four versions: Standard Range, Long Range RWD, Long Range AWD, and Performance, but the Standard Range version has been canceled because of its low range of 244 miles. The Long Range RWD has also been discontinued.

The Tesla Model Y (2021) has 2 different versions: Long Range AWD, and Performance.

The on-board charger of the Tesla Model Y was built to accept 11.5 kW of maximum AC charging power, which means that when connected to a Level 2 charger with a power rating above 11.5 kW, the Tesla Model X will only be capable of accepting up to 11.5 kW.

Depending on your driving style, the road condition, the season, air conditioning system, and seat heating, etc., the driving range of the Tesla Model Y can reach up to 303 miles (Performance), and 326 miles (Long Range AWD).

Types of Charging Stations for Tesla Vehicles

Charging Your Tesla at Home

Most EV drivers plug their cars in every night regardless of how full or empty it is when they come home. They do their charging most of the time at home. And the most popular options for charging a Tesla at home are:

 

  • Tesla Mobile Connectors
  • Tesla Wall Connectors
  • Third-party Level 2 Chargers

1. Tesla Mobile Connectors – Every Tesla vehicle comes with a Tesla mobile charger which can be connected to any regular 110-volt household outlet. The charger with a standard NEMA 5-15 Adapter delivers up to 12 amps (15 amps x 80% = 12 amps) on a 15 amp circuit breaker; that is, the power output can be up to 1.4 kW (110 volts x 12 amps 1.4 kW).

mobile connector1

You can purchase a NEMA 14-50 adapter, which is the most common adapter used in the country, to charge your Tesla. The mobile connector with the NEMA 14-50 adapter can offer 32 amps of maximum power on a 240-volt outlet (240 volts x 32 amps = 7.6 kW). According to the rule of 80% draw, a 240 volt / 40 amp circuit should be applied.

2. Tesla Wall Connectors –The Tesla Gen 3 Wall Connector offers faster speed to charge your car at home. It can deliver up to 48 amps, so that the charging power can be up to 11.5 kW (240 volts x 48 amps /1, 000 = 11.5 kW)

tesla-gen-3-wall-connector ev charger

3. Third-party Level 2 Chargers – A J1772 to Tesla adapter allows you to charge your Tesla on a third-party Level 2 charger.

The power of these Level 2 charging stations varies from 16 amps to 48 amps, that is, from 3.3 kW to 11.5 kW. It can take around 4 to 17 hours to charge a Tesla Model 3 from 10% to 80% of the state of charge.

Charging Your Tesla On the Road

When you take a road trip, you will need public Level 3 charging stations to charge up your car. The most popular charging options for the Tesla vehicles on the road are:

  • Superchargers
  • Third-Party DC Fast Chargers

1. Superchargers – There are V2 and V3 Superchargers. V2 Superchargers, the most common Superchargers around the country, have a feature of power-sharing.

The way it works is A and B stalls share a single power source and charging power is split in half between A and B when both of them are being used.

Therefore, if two cars are charging next to each other at A and B, each of these two cars can only obtain half of the charging power.

Tesla-v2-supercharger
tesla_supercharger_v3

The V2 Superchargers can deliver up to 150 kW of power.

V3 Superchargers don’t share power like the V2 Superchargers. They are the latest and fastest Superchargers which are very rare around the country and the installing speed is slow. The power output of V3 Superchargers can be up to 250 kW.

2. Third-Party DC Fast Chargers – Typically, the third-party DC fast charging stations have CHAdeMO/CSS charging ports. They often offer over 50 kW of charging power.

A CHAdeMO to Tesla or CCS 1 to Tesla adapter allows you to charge your Tesla on a CHAdeMO/CSS DC fast charging station.

How Long Does It Take to Charge Each Tesla Model?

Use our electric vehicle charging time calculators to estimate each Tesla Model charge charge time. How long to charge a Tesla depends on the car model, year, version and which charger you use.

Tesla Charge Time – Examples

Let’s take Tesla Model 3 Long Range (2021) as an example to show the calculation.

NOTE: All results are calculated based on the theoretical assumptions, and may vary under different circumstances in real life.

Battery Capacity: 82 kWh | Driving Range: 353 miles (EPA) | Acceptance Rate of the On-Board Charger: 11.5 kW | Supercharging Max: 250 kW | Efficiency = Driving range / Battery capacity =353 miles / 82 kWh = 4.30 miles/kWh | The average power efficiency is 0.9 in the calculation

  1. Charging Station: Tesla Mobile Connector(NEMA 5-15, Charging Power = 1.32 kW)

Charging power (1.32 kW) < Acceptance rate of the on-board charger (11.5 kW)

  • Charging time from 10% to 80% of charge level

= Battery capacity x (80%-10%) / (Charging power x 0.9)

= 82 kWh x (80%-10%) / (1.32 kW x 0.9)

= 48 hours 19 minutes

  • Charging time at 30 miles of desired distance

=Desired distance / (Efficiency x Charging power x 0.9)

= 30 miles / (4.30 miles/kWh x 1.32 kW x 0.9)

= 5 hours 52 minutes

  • Range per hour of charging (RPH)

= Efficiency x Charging Time x Charging power x 0.9

= 4.30 miles/kWh x 1 h x 1.32 kW x 0.9

= 5.1 miles

  1. Charging Station: Tesla Mobile Connector(NEMA 14-50, Max Charging Power = 7.68 kW)

Charging power (1.4 4kW) < Acceptance rate of the on-board charger (11.5 kW)

  • Charging time from 10% to 80% of charge level

= Battery capacity x (80%-10%) / (Charging power x 0.9)

= 82 kWh x (80%-10%) / (7.68 kW x 0.9)

= 8 hours 19 minutes

  • Charging time at 30 miles of desired distance

=Desired distance / (Efficiency x Charging power x 0.9)

= 30 miles / (4.30 miles/kWh x 7.68 kW x 0.9)

= 1 hour 1 minute

  • Range per hour of charging (RPH)

= Efficiency x Charging Time x Charging power x 0.9

= 4.30 miles/kWh x 1 h x 7.68 kW x 0.9

= 29.8 miles

3. Charging Station: Tesla Gen 3 Wall Connector(NEMA 14-50, Max Charging Power = 7.68 kW)

Charging power (11.52 kW) ≈ Acceptance rate of the on-board charger (11.5 kW)

  • Charging time from 10% to 80% of charge level

= Battery capacity x (80%-10%) / (Charging power x 0.9)

= 82 kWh x (80%-10%) / (11.5 kW x 0.9)

= 5 hours 33 minutes

  • Charging time at 30 miles of desired distance

=Desired distance / (Efficiency x Charging power x 0.9)

= 30 miles / (4.30 miles/kWh x 11.5 kW x 0.9)

= 41 minutes

  • Range per hour of charging (RPH)

= Efficiency x Charging Time x Charging power x 0.9

= 4.30 miles/kWh x 1 h x 11.5 kW x 0.9

= 44.6 miles

4. Charging Station: V2 Supercharger (Charging Power = 150 kW)

  • Charging time from 10% to 80% of charge level

= Battery capacity x (80%-10%) / (Charging power x 0.9)

= 82 kWh x (80%-10%) / (150 kW x 0.9)

= 26 minutes

  • Charging time at 30 miles of desired distance

=Desired distance / (Efficiency x Charging power x 0.9)

= 30 miles / (4.30 miles/kWh x 150 kW x 0.9)

= 4 minutes

5. Charging Station: V3 Supercharger (Max Charging Power = 250 kW)

  • Charging time from 10% to 80% of charge level

= Battery capacity x (80%-10%) / (Charging power x 0.9)

= 82 kWh x (80%-10%) / (250 kW x 0.9)

= 16 minutes

  • Charging time at 30 miles of desired distance

=Desired distance / (Efficiency x Charging power x 0.9)

= 30 miles / (4.30 miles/kWh x 250 kW x 0.9)

= 2 minutes

6. Charging Station: Third-Party DC Fast Charger(Charging Power = 50 kW)

  • Charging time from 10% to 80% of charge level

= Battery capacity x (80%-10%) / (Charging power x 0.9)

= 82 kWh x (80%-10%) / (50 kW x 0.9)

= 1 hour 17 minutes

  • Charging time at 30 miles of desired distance

=Desired distance / (Efficiency x Charging power x 0.9)

= 30 miles / (4.30 miles/kWh x 50 kW x 0.9)

= 10 minutes

Tesla Charge Time – Tables?

1. See the time it takes to charge a Tesla from 10% to 80% of state of charge using various EV home charging stations and Level 3 chargers.

Tesla ModelsModel 3Model SModel XModel Y
Tesla Mobile Connector (NEMA 5-15, 110V/12A)27-44 hours32-54 hours40-54 hours40 hours
Tesla Mobile Connector (NEMA 14-50, 240V/32A)5-8 hours6-10 hours8-10 hours8 hours
Tesla Gen 3 Wall Connector (240V/48A)4-5 hours4-7 hours5-7 hours5 hours
V2 Supercharger (150 kW)16-26 minutes25-39 minutes30-39 minutes24 minutes
V3 Supercharger (250 kW)6-16 minutes19-39 minutes19-39 miutes14 minutes
Third-Party DC Fast Charger (50 kW)47 minutes-1 hour 17 minutes56 minutes-1 hour 34 minutes1 hour 11 minutes-1 hour 34 minutes1 hour 11 minutes

2. See the time it takes to charge a Tesla a certain distance (30 miles) using various EV home charging stations and Level 3 chargers.

Tesla ModelsModel 3Model SModel XModel Y
Tesla Mobile Connector (NEMA 5-15, 110V/12A)4-6 hours4-8 hours6-8 hours5-6 hours
Tesla Mobile Connector (NEMA 14-50, 240V/32A)51 minutes-1 hour51 minutes-1 hour 29 minutes1 hour 13 minutes-1 hour 34 minutes1 hour
Tesla Gen 3 Wall Connector (240V/48A)41-60 minutes34 minutes-1 hour49 minutes-1 hour41-44 minutes
V2 Supercharger (150 kW)3-4 minutes3-6 minutes4-6minutes4 minutes
V3 Supercharger (250 kW)2-3 minutes2-6 minutes3-6 minutes2 minutes
Third-Party DC Fast Charger (50 kW)8-11 minutes8-14 minutes12-15 minutes10 minutes

3. See the charging speed (the added range per hour of charging, RPH) of a Tesla using various EV home charging stations.

Tesla modelsModel 3Model SModel XModel Y
Tesla Mobile Connector (NEMA 5-15, 110V/12A)5-6 miles3-6 miles3-4 miles5 miles
Tesla Mobile Connector (NEMA 14-50, 240V/32A)26-36 miles20-36 miles19-25 miles28-30 miles
Tesla Gen 3 Wall Connector (240V/48A)30-45 miles30-53 miles29-37 miles42-45 miles

Future Tesla Vehicles

Some of the specifications associated with the charging time calculation of the future Tesla vehicles haven’t been released.

But if you are curious, you can make some assumptions and use our battery charge time calculator to estimate the charge time.

Tesla Cybertruck

As the most popular electric truck around the country, the Tesla Cybertruck with 3 versions was announced in late 2019.

The production of the Dual Motor AWD and Tri Motor AWD Cybertruck was announced to begin in late 2021, with the Single Motor RWD into production in late 2022.

While we don’t know its battery capacity, the acceptance rate of the on-board charger, or the maximum supercharging power yet, we have the range: 250 miles (Single Motor RWD), 300 miles (Dual Motor AWD), and 500 miles (Tri Motor AWD).

tesla-cybertruck
tesla-roadster-2022

Tesla Roadster 2022

The second-generation Tesla Roadster was announced by Elon Musk on November 16, 2017, and may be released in 2022, following the track of the first generation of Tesla Roadster (also Tesla’s first vehicle) which was launched in 2008.

As the most highly-anticipated supercar in the world, the Tesla Roadster 2022 is planned to appear with the Base and the Founders Series models. The latter model will come with only 1,000 being produced.

In terms of battery and range specifications, the Tesla Roadster 2022 will have a 200 kWh battery pack that can cover 620 miles of range on a single charge.

Tesla has not released the exact acceptance rate of the on-board charger, and the maximum supercharging power of the Tesla Roadster 2022.

Tesla Semi

On November 16, 2017, Elon Musk announced the plan of production for a Tesla electric semi-truck (Tesla Semi).

Before the start of production, the capacity of battery packs that are surprisingly smaller than we thought was revealed, which is 500 kWh.

While the Tesla Semi was expected to have a larger capacity of battery packs ranging from 600 kWh to 1 MWh.

tesla-semi

Elon Musk explained that the battery for passenger cars had been chosen because of the lack of the battery production capability.

In addition, a 300-mile version of the Tesla Semi would be put into production at the end of 2021, and the longer range Semi version (500-mile version) would be coming later.

We can use EV home chargers, Tesla Superchargers, and third-party DC fast charging stations to charge the Semi vehicles.

Besides, a more powerful Supercharger network-Tesla Megacharger with over 1MW of power output, would also be deployed to charge the Tesla Semi.

The solar would power the Megacharger, which is a good way of taking advantage of solar power.

Best EV Charging Stations in Los Angeles, CA

Best EV Charging Stations in Los Angeles, CA

According to Gov. Gavin Newsom, new gasoline-powered cars will be stopped for sale in California, and all new passenger cars sold must be zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2035, so the CO2 emissions will be reduced by 35%.

The LA Department of Water and Power (LADWP) set a goal of 10,000 publicly available EV chargers by 2022 as part of its Green New Deal. Actually, as of January 2021, LA has 11,045 commercial EV chargers, already exceeding the goal.

LADWP has been offering rebates for the installation of EV charging stations to speed up the process. Up to $5,000 for a level 2 charger, up to $75,000 for a fast charger, and up to $125,000 for a charger being able to charge a medium- or heavy-duty electric vehicle has been offered. The chargers are installed on Power poles, workplaces, city buildings, etc.

On a city level, LA set a target of 80% zero mission vehicles by 2036 and 100% by 2045.

As of January 2021, almost 2,500 publicly available EV charging stations and almost 8,500 chargers at workplaces and apartment buildings have been installed for use in LA.

 

#1 Los Angeles Zoo

EV charging stations in Los Angeles Zoo

Address: 5333 Zoo Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90027

Charging Network: Greenlots

Charging Power: 50 kW

Charging Plugs: CCS/SAE, CHAdeMO, J-1772

Hours: 10 AM to5 PM – Daily.

Cost: Free

Due to COVID-19, the zoo was closed before, but now the zoo has reopened for LA residents since February 2021. All guests, including members, must make reservations before visiting the zoo.

At this location, there are 6 Level-2 stations with J-1772 plug, one DC fast charger with CHAdeMO and CCS/SAE. You can charge your car while visiting the zoo. Tesla drivers can also charge their Tesla with the CHAdeMO or CCS adapters. So almost all electric vehicles sold in America can use these stations. One thing that you should know is that only one can use the DC fast charger one time despite two ports at the charger.

 

#2 Arch Dr Parking/Charging

Arch-Dr-parking-Charging

Address: 4261 Arch Dr, Studio City, CA 91604

Charging Network: Greenlots

Charging Power: 50 kW

Charging Plugs: CCS/SAE, CHAdeMO

Hours: Open 24/7

This charging station owned by LADWP is located at an alley that is behind some apartments. People who live in the apartments and own electric vehicles can charge their cars at this charging station.

The station with CHAdeMO and CSS/SAE charging plugs can charge up to 50 kW under the Greenlots network. So people can charge their car from 10% to 80% of capacity within an hour if they own a 50 kWh of battery capacity. As there is only one station, it may be in use most of the time.

 

#3 LADWP

ev-chargers-in-LADWP

Address: 14061 Riverside Dr, Sherman Oaks, CA 91423

Charging Network: Greenlots

Charging Power: 50 kW

Charging Plugs: CCS/SAE, CHAdeMO

Hours: Open 24/7

The charger is located on the east side of Hazeltine Ave and the north side of Riverside Dr. The charging plugs are CHAdeMO and CCS/SAE, available for most electric vehicles on the market in the United States. The station is operated under the Greenlots network with 50 kW of maximum power output. However, the charger has not been working since February. As of May 6, 2021, it’s still been down.

#4 Playa Vista Community Center (EVgo Charging Station)

ev-chargers-in-Playa-Vista-Community-Center

Address: 12855 W Runway Rd, Los Angeles, CA 90094

Charging Network: EVgo

Charging Power: 7.2 – 50 kW

Charging Plugs: CCS/SAE, CHAdeMO, J-1772

Cost: Payment Required

DC: $0.27/min

AC: $0.03/min

Hours: Open 24/7

Website: evgo.com

The charging station is located in Playa Vista by Brookfield Residential, on the south side of W Runway Rd and west side of McConnell Ave. You can find “EVgo Charging Station” on the Google map. The EVgo fast charger can deliver up to 50 kW with CHAdeMo or CCS/SAE plugs. The charger also has a J-1772 plug which can offer at least 7.2 kW of power.

 

#5 LADOT Sylmar Metrolink Station (EV Connect Charging Station)

LADOT-Sylmar-Metrolink-Station

Address: Village Way Dr, San Fernando, CA 91340

Charging Network: EV Connect

Charging Power: 6.24 kW

Charging Plugs: J-1772

Cost: Free

Hours: Open 24/7

Website: evconnect.com

This charger is a Level 2 charging station with a J-1772 plug, which offers about 6.24 kW of power. Four stations are built for use. You should download the EV Connect 2 app and register before using the chargers.

 

#6 LADWP

ev charging stations in LADWP

Address: 1394 S Sepulveda Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90025

Charging Network: Greenlots

Charging Power: 50 kW

Charging Plugs: CCS/SAE, CHAdeMO

Hours: Open 24/7

Only one charging station is installed, and the Level 3 fast charger, delivering up to 50 kW of power, is owned by LADWP. CHAdeMo and CSS/SAE plugs are available for use.

How Long Does It Take to Charge an Electric Car?

How Long Does It Take to Charge an Electric Car?

Note: The following information applies mainly to North America.

How long does it take to charge an electric car? This is the question that many people, especially people trying to switch from gasoline cars to electric cars, ask.

Because compared with the fueling time of the gasoline car, the charging time is obviously much longer, which bothers a lot of people.

In this article, we will display the factors that affect electric vehicle charging time, and the charging time for the best electric cars in 2021.

We hope this article can alleviate some concerns you might have in switching gas cars to electric cars.

You can use our electric car charging time calculator to see the charge time of your EV both at home and on the road specifically.

Electric Car Charging Types

There are essentially three types of EV Charging: Level 1, Level 2, and DC Fast Charging.

  • Level 1 Charging

Every EV comes with a basic 120-volt Level 1 home charger, which can connect to the regular household outlet (110 volts in the USA). You can charge your electric car on that outlet, but it’s super slow, and it only charges at about 2 to 5 miles of range per hour.

Realistically speaking, only 40 miles of range, even less can be added every night when you use one of these chargers.

However, it’s not the fault of the EV or the charger. The home outlet is designed to deliver 12 amps of maximum continuous current. If you were to try to pull more power, the breaker would trip and protect the wires from melting or getting into fire.

Some people get away with this because they have a plug-in hybrid with a smaller battery, or they don’t drive a lot, but the vast majority of people want something faster.

  • Level 2 Charging

Most EV drivers will install a Level 2 charging station in their garage. The Level 2 units accept 240 volts and deliver 16, 24 amps, up to 48 amps of power. 32 amps is probably the most common power level for home charging stations.

They’ll deliver somewhere between 15 to 20 miles of range per hour up to 45 miles of range per hour, which is a significant difference in a significant upgrade from the 2 to 5 miles of range per hour that you can get on Level 1.

For that reason many people would prefer to install a 240-volt charging equipment in their garage or at their home.

  • Level 3 Charging

When you want to take a road trip and travel long distances, you need something even faster. That’s where DC fast charging comes in. These DC fast charging stations are much larger, much more powerful, and charge your car much faster.

DC is Direct Current which is a different type of electricity. So with the DC fast charging (sometimes called Level 3), the power goes straight into the battery. That’s why EVs can charge at a much higher rate on a DC fast charger.

Up to 1200 miles an hour can be added on a DC fast charger, and since no electric car can actually go 1200 miles per charge, you wouldn’t need to charge for an hour or for a long time.

Typically, most electric cars can charge to about 80% in half an hour or less on a DC fast charger. You’re probably only going to be there for somewhere between 20 minutes and 45 minutes, depending on how much you need to charge and depending on if there is a line because sometimes that happens during holidays and really busy locations.

    Factors that Affect Charging Rate of an Electric Car

    How long does it take to charge an electric car?

    This is a valid and simple question, but the answer is not that simple.

    That’s because there are a couple of factors that affect the charging speed of an electric car:

    factors-affect-charging-speed

    Type and Power Output of the Charging Station

    Level 2 charging stations have power outputs of around 3.8, 5.7, 7.6, 9.6, and even 11.5 kW.

    DC fast chargers can deliver from 50 kW, up to 270 kW, or even 350 kW.

    Theoretically speaking, the more power outputs the charger produces, the faster the charge will take.

    However, in practice, this may not be true.

    power-outputs-of-charging-stations

    For example, the charging station delivers up to 3 kW of power, and your car is capable of accepting 6 kW of rate. 3 kW would be the charging speed.

    The car would “talk” to the charging station, and both of them “decide” that the final charging rate should be 3 kW.

    Type and Power Output of the Charging Station

    What if it were the reverse situation? The charging station is capable of delivering 6 kW, but your car can only charge at 3 kW?

    Even though the charger delivers more power than the first situation, the final charging rate would still be 3 kW.

    That’s because the control pilot pin on the J1772 connector of a EV home charger would negotiate the highest power standard between the charging station and the electric car.

    If the charging station delivers less power than the maximum charging speed at which the car can accept, the charging station is the limiting factor that influences the charging speed;

    if the acceptance rate of the electric car is lower than the maximum power delivery rate, the car is the limiting factor.

    Storage Capacity of the Battery

    Typically, the larger the battery capacity, the longer it takes to be replenished.

    A Level 1 charger can put around 5 miles of range into your EV every hour.

    For Level 2 stations, an entry of 16 amps can deliver around 12 miles of range per hour; a 32-amp one can double that, about 25 miles per hour, etc.

    These estimates above vary depending on the car.

    Especially, the size of the battery can affect how long these standards take to charge.

    For example, a Tesla Model 3 Long Range (2021) has a large battery capable of around 353 miles.

    It takesm ore than 51 hours to from zero to 80% of charge level on Level 1 and 8 or 9 hours on Level 2.

    In comparison, a Toyota Prius Prime that can only accept 16 amps maximum is a plug-in hybrid with a much smaller battery, good for 25 miles of range.

    So it takes around 4 hours for 80% of charge state on Level 1 charging or 2 hours on a Level 2, 16-amp charger.

    It can be seen that Tesla Model 3 Long Range charges slower because its battery is much larger.

    However, the charging time is calculated based on “empty” to “full”, which is unlikely to happen.

    From practical experience, you don’t need to charge your car to get a full level, and you don’t even need to replenish a lot of your battery every time.

    Just like your mobile phone, you simply plug it, then unplug it and get back on the road when the battery is at a desirable level.

    Acceptance Rate of On-Board Charger

    Level 1 and Level 2 that you have in your house is Alternating Current (AC).

    When you charge at home on Level one or Level two, the AC power goes into the car through your inverter (on-board charger).

    Actually, it’s the inverter that charges your battery. The inverter converts AC power into DC (Direct Current) power since batteries are inherently DC by nature.

    So the acceptance rate of the on-board charger is one of those limiting factors that affect the charging speed.

    acceptance-rate-of-on-board-charger

    But a DC fast charging station charges the battery directly because the DC power bypasses the on-board charger and goes straight into the battery.

    How depleted the battery is

    With all lithium batteries, charging rates start to drop as the battery is beyond 80% of full. It charges more quickly to get the first 80% of capacity than the remaining 20%. 

    It’s designed to keep the current at a consistent level when close to full in order to ensure battery health.

    battery depletion

    Outside Temperature

    When the weather is cold, slower charging happens, particularly when on a rapid charger.

    Battery heating systems try to maintain the charging at a constant rate, but they draw extra current when doing so, which leads to an increase in charging time.

    So it takes longer to charge an EV under cold weather.

    Top-Rated Electric Car Charging Times

    Use our electric vehicle charging time calculators to estimate the EV charge time. How long to charge an EV depends on the car model year, version and which charger you use.

    NOTE: All results are calculated based on the theoretical assumptions, and may vary under different circumstances in real life.

    Affordable Electric Vehicles

    1. Tesla Model 3 Standard Range Plus (2021)

    Battery Capacity: 50 kWh | Driving Range: 263 miles (EPA) | Acceptance Rate of the On-Board Charger: 7.6 kW | Supercharging Max: 170 kW

      • Charging Time from 10% to 80% of Charge Level

    Home EV Charging

    16 amps: 10 hours 8 minutes

    24 amps: 6 hours 46 minutes

    32 amps: 5 hours 8 minutes

    48 amps: 5 hours 8 minutes

    Supercharging

    120 kW: 20 minutes

    170 kW: 14 minutes

      • Charging Time at 30 Miles of Desired Distance

    Home EV Charging

    16 amps: 1 hour 40 minutes

    24 amps: 1 hour 7 minutes

    32 amps: 51 minutes

    48 amps: 51 minutes

    Supercharging

    120 kW: 4 minutes

    170 kW: 3 minutes

    2. Kia Niro EV (2020)

    Battery Capacity: 64 kWh | Driving Range: 239 miles (EPA) | Acceptance Rate of the On-Board Charger: 7.2 kW 

      • Charging Time from 10% to 80% of Charge Level

    Home EV Charging

    16 amps: 12 hours 58 minutes

    24 amps: 8 hours 39 minutes

    32 amps: 6 hours 55 minutes

    48 amps: 6 hours 55 minutes

    DC Fast Charging

    50 kW: 1 hour

    100 kW: 30 minutes

      • Charging Time at 30 Miles of Desired Distance

    Home EV Charging

    16 amps: 2 hours 20 minutes

    24 amps: 1 hour 33 minutes

    32 amps: 1 hour 15 minutes

    48 amps: 1 hour 15 minutes

    DC Fast Charging

    50 kW: 11 minutes

    100 kW: 6 minutes

    3. Hyundai Kona Electric (2021)

    Battery Capacity: 64 kWh | Driving Range: 259 miles (EPA) | Acceptance Rate of the On-Board Charger: 7.2 kW

      • Charging Time from 10% to 80% of Charge Level

    Home EV Charging

    16 amps: 12 hours 58 minutes

    24 amps: 8 hours 39 minutes

    32 amps: 6 hours 55 minutes

    48 amps: 6 hours 55 minutes

    DC Fast Charging

    50 kW: 1 hour

    100 kW: 30 minutes

      • Charging Time at 30 Miles of Desired Distance

    Home EV Charging

    16 amps: 2 hours 9 minutes

    24 amps: 1 hour 26 minutes

    32 amps: 1 hour 9 minutes

    48 amps: 1 hour 9 minutes

    DC Fast Charging

    50 kW: 10 minutes

    100 kW: 5 minutes

    4. Chevrolet Bolt EV (2021)

    Battery Capacity: 65 kWh | Driving Range: 259 miles (EPA) | Acceptance Rate of the On-Board Charger: 11 kW | DC Fast Charging Max: 55 kW

      • Charging Time from 10% to 80% of Charge Level

    Home EV Charging

    16 amps: 13 hours 10 minutes

    24 amps: 8 hours 47 minutes

    32 amps: 6 hours 35 minutes

    48 amps: 4 hours 36 minutes

    DC Fast Charging

    55 kW: 56 minutes

      • Charging Time at 30 Miles of Desired Distance

    Home EV Charging

    16 amps: 2 hours 11 minutes

    24 amps: 1 hour 28 minutes

    32 amps: 1 hour 6 minutes

    48 amps: 46 minutes

    DC Fast Charging

    55 kW: 10 minutes

    5. Nissan Leaf (2021)

    Battery Capacity: 40 kWh | Driving Range: 149 miles (EPA) | Acceptance Rate of the On-Board Charger: 6.6 kW | DC Fast Charging Max: 50 kW

      • Charging Time from 10% to 80% of Charge Level

    Home EV Charging

    16 amps: 8 hours 7 minutes

    24 amps: 5 hours 25 minutes

    32 amps: 4 hours 43 minutes

    48 amps: 4 hours 43 minutes

    DC Fast Charging

    50 kW: 38 minutes

    • Charging Time at 30 Miles of Desired Distance

    Home EV Charging

    16 amps: 2 hours 20 minutes

    24 amps: 1 hour 34 minutes

    32 amps: 1 hour 22 minutes

    48 amps: 1 hour 22 minutes

    DC Fast Charging

    50 kW: 11 minutes

    Luxury Electric Vehicles

    1. Porsche Taycan 4S (2021)

    Battery Capacity: 79.2 kWh | Driving Range: 199 miles (EPA) | Acceptance Rate of the On-Board Charger: 9.6 kW | DC Fast Charging Max: 270 kW

      • Charging Time from 10% to 80% of Charge Level

    Home EV Charging

    16 amps: 16 hours 3 minutes

    24 amps: 10 hours 42 minutes

    32 amps: 8 hours 2 minutes

    48 amps: 6 hours 25 minutes

    DC Fast Charging

    50 kW: 38 minutes

    100 kW: 37 minutes

    270 kW: 14 minutes

      • Charging Time at 30 Miles of Desired Distance

    Home EV Charging

    16 amps: 3 hours 28 minutes

    24 amps: 2 hours 19 minutes

    32 amps: 1 hour 44 minutes

    48 amps: 1 hour 23 minutes

    DC Fast Charging

    50 kW: 11 minutes

    100 kW: 8 minutes

    270 kW: 3 minutes

    2. Tesla Model 3 Long Range (2021)

    Battery Capacity: 82 kWh | Driving Range: 353 miles (EPA) | Acceptance Rate of the On-Board Charger: 11.5 kW |  Supercharging Max: 250 kW

      • Charging Time from 10% to 80% of Charge Level

    Home EV Charging

    16 amps: 16 hours 37 minutes

    24 amps: 11 hours 5 minutes

    32 amps: 8 hours 19 minutes

    48 amps: 5 hours 33 minutes

    Supercharging

    120 kW: 32 minutes

    250 kW: 16 minutes

      • Charging Time at 30 Miles of Desired Distance

    Home EV Charging

    16 amps: 2 hours 1 minute

    24 amps: 1 hour 21 minutes

    32 amps: 1 hour 1 minute

    48 amps: 41 minutes

    Supercharging

    120 kW: 4 minutes

    250 kW: 2 minutes

    3. Tesla Model S (2021)

    Battery Capacity: 100 kWh | Driving Range: 390 miles (EPA) | Acceptance Rate of the On-Board Charger: 11.5 kW |  Supercharging Max: 250 kW

      • Charging Time from 10% to 80% of Charge Level

    Home EV Charging

    16 amps: 20 hours 16 minutes

    24 amps: 13 hours 31 minutes

    32 amps: 10 hours 8 minutes

    48 amps: 6 hours 46 minutes

    Supercharging

    120 kW: 39 minutes

    250 kW: 19 minutes

      • Charging Time at 30 Miles of Desired Distance

    Home EV Charging

    16 amps: 2 hours 14 minute

    24 amps: 1 hour 30 minutes

    32 amps: 1 hour 7 minutes

    48 amps: 45 minutes

    Supercharging

    120 kW: 5 minutes

    250 kW: 3 minutes

    4. Polestar 2 (2021)

    Battery Capacity: 78 kWh | Driving Range: 233 miles (EPA) | Acceptance Rate of the On-Board Charger: 11 kW | DC Fast Charging Max: 150 kW

      • Charging Time from 10% to 80% of Charge Level

    Home EV Charging

    16 amps: 15 hours 48 minutes

    24 amps: 10 hours 32 minutes

    32 amps: 7 hours 54 minutes

    48 amps: 5 hours 31 minutes

    DC Fast Charging

    50 kW: 1 hour 13 minutes

    100 kW: 37 minutes

    150 kW: 25 minutes

      • Charging Time at 30 Miles of Desired Distance

    Home EV Charging

    16 amps: 2 hours 55 minutes

    24 amps: 1 hour 57 minutes

    32 amps: 1 hour 28 minutes

    48 amps: 1 hour 1 minute

    DC Fast Charging

    50 kW: 14 minutes

    100 kW: 7 minutes

    150 kW: 5 minutes

    Luxury Electric SUVs

    1. Ford Mustang Mach-E (2021)

    Battery Capacity: 68 kWh | Driving Range: 230 miles (EPA) | Acceptance Rate of the On-Board Charger: 11 kW | DC Fast Charging Max: 115 kW

      • Charging Time from 10% to 80% of Charge Level

    Home EV Charging

    16 amps: 13 hours 47 minutes

    24 amps: 9 hours 11 minutes

    32 amps: 6 hours 54 minutes

    48 amps: 4 hours 49 minutes

    DC Fast Charging

    50 kW: 1 hour 4 minutes

    100 kW: 32 minutes

    115 kW: 28 minutes

      • Charging Time at 30 Miles of Desired Distance

    Home EV Charging

    16 amps: 2 hours 34 minutes

    24 amps: 1 hour 43 minutes

    32 amps: 1 hour 17 minutes

    48 amps: 54 minutes

    DC Fast Charging

    50 kW: 12 minutes

    100 kW: 6 minutes

    115 kW: 6 minutes

    2. Audi e-tron (2021)

    Battery Capacity: 95 kWh | Driving Range: 222 miles (EPA) | Acceptance Rate of the On-Board Charger: 22 kW | DC Fast Charging Max: 150 kW

      • Charging Time from 10% to 80% of Charge Level

    Home EV Charging

    16 amps: 19 hours 15 minutes

    24 amps: 12 hours 50 minutes

    32 amps: 9 hours 38 minutes

    48 amps: 6 hours 25 minutes

    DC Fast Charging

    50 kW: 1 hour 29 minutes

    100 kW: 45 minutes

    150 kW: 30 minutes

      • Charging Time at 30 Miles of Desired Distance

    Home EV Charging

    16 amps: 3 hours 43 minutes

    24 amps: 2 hours 29 minutes

    32 amps: 1 hour 52 minutes

    48 amps: 1 hour 15 minutes

    DC Fast Charging

    50 kW: 18 minutes

    100 kW: 9 minutes

    150 kW: 6 minutes

    3. Tesla Model Y (2021)

    Battery Capacity: 75 kWh | Driving Range: 303 miles (EPA) | Acceptance Rate of the On-Board Charger: 11.5 kW |  Supercharging Max: 250 kW

      • Charging Time from 10% to 80% of Charge Level

    Home EV Charging

    16 amps: 15 hours 12 minutes

    24 amps: 10 hours 8 minutes

    32 amps: 7 hours 36 minutes

    48 amps: 5 hours 5 minutes

    Supercharging

    120 kW: 30 minutes

    250 kW: 14 minutes

      • Charging Time at 30 Miles of Desired Distance

    Home EV Charging

    16 amps: 2 hours 9 minute

    24 amps: 1 hour 26 minutes

    32 amps: 1 hour 5 minutes

    48 amps: 44 minutes

    Supercharging

    120 kW: 5 minutes

    250 kW: 2 minutes

    4. Tesla Model X (2021)

    Battery Capacity: 100 kWh | Driving Range: 340 miles (EPA) | Acceptance Rate of the On-Board Charger: 11.5 kW |  Supercharging Max: 250 kW

      • Charging Time from 10% to 80% of Charge Level

    Home EV Charging

    16 amps: 20 hours 16 minutes

    24 amps: 13 hours 31 minutes

    32 amps: 10 hours 8 minutes

    48 amps: 6 hours 46 minutes

    Supercharging

    120 kW: 39 minutes

    250 kW: 19 minutes

      • Charging Time at 30 Miles of Desired Distance

    Home EV Charging

    16 amps: 2 hours 34 minute

    24 amps: 1 hour 43 minutes

    32 amps: 1 hour 17 minutes

    48 amps: 52 minutes

    Supercharging

    120 kW: 5 minutes

    250 kW: 3 minutes

    EV Charging Stations Near Me

    EV Charging Stations Near Me

    Map powered by PlugShare.com.


    Map powered by OpenChargeMap.

    Note: As the PlugShare map is not shown on mobile, the openchargemap is applied on mobile and we use the Plugshare map for PC use.

    Introduction

    As electric vehicles (EVs) are more and more popular, the most common problem or worry that EV drivers have is how to charge their electric cars;

    where I find electric car charging stations near me;

    if EV charging stations are widely available in my area;

    what kind of car charging stations I should use.

    Before you ask about where to find electric car chargers nearby, you should get to know about these charging stations more.

    So read on to find out everything you need to know.

    Firstly, Let’s go through some charging basics that you need to learn about.

    What is an EV charging station?

    A charging station is used for electric vehicles to recharge their on-board batteries.

    An electric vehicle charging station is also called an EV charging point, electric charger, car charger, and EVSE (electric vehicle supply equipment).

    People would normally assume that “charging stations” and “chargers” are the same things.

    Technically speaking, the “chargers” are referred to be as the on-board chargers built in the electric cars.

    We call them “chargers” or “charging stations” in this article because that’s what the public understands.

    We don’t want to confuse people, but we’d like to clarify that.

     

    on-board charger-what is an EV charging station

     

    Different DC fast charging stations have different charging capabilities varying from 7-270 KW, even up to 350 kW.

    The charging capability is also limited by the maximum charging power that your vehicles can take.

    For example, some vehicles such as Nissan Leaf can only do 50 KW max to charge the batteries and this leads to a longer charging time.

    But higher-end vehicles such as Porsche Tycan can charge at a whopping 350 KW.

    Should I Charge My Car On a DC Fast Charging Station or at Home?

    The answer depends on your need, such as how fast do you want to charge your car or how much money are you willing to pay for charging your car?

    There are Level 1 and Level 2 chargers that you can install at home.

    You can use Level 1 chargers at your home by plugging them into your regular household power outlets, but their charging speeds are quite slow.

    An improved version, level 2 chargers, are also available to be installed into your garage that can use 240-volt outlets to charge your vehicle with 16-50 amps current.

    Both of these chargers are cheaper to use than public fast-charging stations, but they take much longer to get your car fully charged. So if you are on a road trip and would like to refill the battery relatively faster, then you would probably want to use a public DC fast charging station.

    What Kind of EV Charging Stations are Available When You are On a Road Trip?

    EV Charging Stations Near Me

    DC Fast Charging Stations  There are multiple kinds of charging stations available so that you are not short of choices: Tesla Superchargers for Tesla vehicles and third-party fast chargers for non-Tesla EVs.

    The lowest charging power that public chargers can offer is 7 KW.

    The most frequently used chargers are DC 60KW to 150KW fast chargers that usually takes about 30min-45min to give you a realistic range for your next stretch of the journey.

    Shared Home EV Chargers – There are also home charging stations that you can use along your road trip.

    Because some people add their home charging stations to the PlugShare map and invite you to come charge at their home, so if you are in need of a charge but you can’t make it to the nearest public DC fast charging station, you can charge your EV on those shared EV home chargers.

    NEMA 14-50 Electrical Sockets  When there are no public EV charging stations and shared home chargers available nearby, RV parks could be used to charge your electric car as a last resort.

    Generally, the RV parks have NEMA 14-50 outlets, so you can use almost any Level 2 EV home charger, such as ChargePoint Home Flex, Enel X Juicebox Pro 40, Tesla Wall Connector, Wallbox Pulsar Plus, etc., instead of standard household connections to charge your EV.

    Generally, the DC fast chargers are the primary option when you’re travelling long distances.

    On the other hand, even though it could take potentially hours for a charge on either shared home charging stations or at NEMA 14-50 electrical sockets from RV parks, these charging stations are good alternatives under some circumstances.

    What Type of Charging Connectors and Adapters are Used On EV Charging Stations?

    In North America, there are two charging connector standards (J1772 and Tesla connectors) for Level 2 charging and three different standards (Combined Charging System (CSS) Combo, CHAdeMO and Tesla connectors) for Level 3 charging.

     

    Charging Connectors and Adapters


    Level 2 Charging
    J1772 Connector
    J1772 to Tesla Adapter
    Tesla to J1772 Adapter

    DC Fast Charging
    CSS Combo
    CHAdemo
    CSS1 to Tesla Adapter
    CHAdemo to Tesla Adapter
    Level 2 & DC Fast Charging
    Tesla Connector

    Charging Connectors

    J1772 Connector – Firstly, let’s take a look at the J1772 connector, which is the standard connector for all electric cars sold in North America except Tesla.

    There are two pins that are used to deliver power.

    When your electric car is connected to a 110-volt or 120-volt outlet, the three pins of the J1772 connector become hot, neutral, and ground wires separately.

    When connected to a 240-volt outlet, the connector has two hot pins, a proximity detection, a control pilot, and a ground pin.

     

     

    The proximity detection is used to detect if a car is plugged in.

    The control pilot is what is used to negotiate the highest power standard between the charging station and the electric car.

    CSS Combo – The CSS Combo, an extension of the J1772, has been adopted by the vast majority of manufacturers, like Ford, GM, Volkswagen, Jaguar, Porsche, etc.

    CHAdeMO – The CHAdeMO is a Japanese standard and Nissan Leaf uses this connector type.

    In the USA, CHAdeMO had been for a long time, but CSS is beginning to outnumber CHAdeMO at a rapid rate.

    Tesla Connector – Tesla has their own proprietary connector, which can be used for both AC charging (Level 1 and 2 charging) and DC charging (Level 3 charging).

    By contrast, The CSS Combo and CHAdeMO are only used for DC fast charging.

    To determine which connector your car is compatible with, check your owner’s manual and the manufacturer’s official website, or open the charge door and see which port your car has.

    Charging Adapters

    J1772 to Tesla adapter – A J1772 to Tesla adapter comes with each Tesla vehicle so that when you need to charge your Tesla on a third-party home charger, you can connect the adapter and the home charger, and the charger will turn into a Tesla compatible charger instantly.

    Tesla to J1772 adapter – A Tesla to J1772 adapter allows you to connect Non-Tesla electric cars to Tesla charging stations.

    However, the adapter is compatible with Tesla Wall Connector, Tesla Destination Charger, and Tesla Mobile Connector, but it doesn’t work on a Tesla Supercharger.

    CHAdeMO / CCS 1 to Tesla adapter – You drive a Tesla, and you can charge your car at a Tesla supercharger, but if there is an emergency on a long road trip, such as you visit a relative or a friend or you have a house somewhere in the mountains where there are no Tesla superchargers, a CHAdeMO to Tesla or CCS 1 to Tesla adapter could  help you charge your Tesla on a CHAdeMO/CSS DC fast charging station. Of course, it won’t charge as fast as superchargers do.

    Compared with other DC fast charging networks, Tesla is better, but having more options is good.

    If you needed a few extra miles and maybe in between superchargers or just in an area where there aren’t that many superchargers, it would have been more convenient for you to stop on a road trip at a CCS fast charging station.

    Of course, whether it’s worth purchasing a CHAdeMO/CCS 1 to Tesla adapter or not depends on how often you go on road trips and where you drive.

    Best Charging Networks Used on EV Charging Stations

    The most well-known suppliers of these DC fast chargers are Electrify America, EVgo and ChargePoint.

    They have their DC fast charging station networks all over the country.

    Some of them, such as ChargePoint and EVgo create partner roaming agreements to make it convenient for EV drivers to charge their cars wherever they go.

    Partner roaming agreements between charging networks allow EV drivers to access other networks without roaming fees and the need to sign up for any additional accounts.

    For example, if you have an account of ChargePoint network, you can use the network app to charge at an EVgo station; vice versa.

    How can I Find a Tesla Supercharger Near Me?

    Most people will take Tesla vehicles into considerations when they purchase an electric car.

    Tesla offers their fast-charging solutions to their customers and they work brilliantly.

    Most Tesla superchargers are 150 KW V2 chargers which can give you most of the range in under 30 min.

    Then the natural question that pops up is how I can find Tesla charging stations near me.

     

     

    Tesla’s supercharging stations are all over the country.

    Tesla drivers usually plan their trip by using their on-board Trip Planner in their cars and the system will list all the Tesla superchargers that you need to visit to recharge your car along the way to your destination.

    Or you can use the PlugShare app to locate the nearest Tesla chargers. Each charging session usually takes less than 30 min.

    How to Locate the Third-Party DC Fast Charging Stations?

    There is a variety of fast DC charging stations available for non-Tesla EV drivers.

    You can use a smartphone app such as PlugShare to find the fast chargers near you.

    The most well-known suppliers of these DC fast chargers are Electrify America, EVgo and ChargePoint.

    They have their DC fast charging station networks all over the country.

    And you can conveniently see them show up on a map with the specs of the charging station and whether they are currently available or not.

    How does the Electric Car Charging Stations Locator work?

    The embedded map is powered by PlugShare.com.

    PlugShare app is a widely used smartphone app for EV drivers that can help you find charging stations that suit your need.

    PlugShare is a map-based EV charging station locator and you can zoom in to find the specific charging station near you.

    Information of different charging stations includes charging port types, charging power, charging station status, charging station operator, and more.

    You can also put your vehicle information into the system to show charging stations that you can use.

    An integrated payment system for different charging stations is also included in the app.

    For example, you are using Electrify America stations at this stop but you are using EVgo charging stations at your next stop, you can pay both of your charging sessions in the PlugShare app without the need of opening a different app.

    Just type in a charging station name, or desired location into the search bar, either enter an address, or city, or simply a zip code, and all the charging stations will then be presented in that specific area.

    Best Electric Car Charging Stations Maps

    Electric car charging stations are being installed constantly. The following charging maps offer extensive search functions to locate public EV chargers.

    PlugShare

    The PlugShare app is highly recommended to both current EV drivers as well as people looking to get into their first electric car.

    It is one of the best apps to find EV charging stations nearby.

     

     

    Open Charge Map

    Open Charge Map is an open-source map for electric vehicle charging locations that some nonprofits, companies, and users support.

    It’s an awesome alternative way against PlugShare to locate the nearest EV charging stations.

     

     

    Alternative Fueling Station Locator

    The Alternative Fueling Station Locator service is run by the US Department of Energy.

    This map app helps you find fueling stations so you can use this app to locate EV charging stations.

    You may not use this app as your primary map, but it could be an option.

     

     

    Alternative Options to Find Charging Stations

    You can also search EV charging stations near you on Google Maps, but there is much less information about these charging stations and some of them are not even listed on the map.

    Some companies like ChargePoint, Flo, and even Tesla provide the availability to find charging stations on their network.

    However, PlugShare and Open Charge Map win a higher score on high-quality user experience and become much better options when people try to find the nearest EV charging stations.

    All of these applications are available on the web or on iOS and Android.

    They can help you find the charging stations where you need them.

    Notice: Errors and omissions may happen in any of these apps.

    Conclusion

    When you plan to take a road trip, you’d better plan ahead and make sure where alternative charging stations that work on your EV may exist, so go ahead and give it a shot on our EV charging stations locator

    You may also want to know how long it takes to charge your EV to a desirable range on different charging stations; how much it costs to charge your electric car.

    We hope this article can help you find electric charging stations wherever you need them.

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